Mar 312013
 

Recently I purchased a second hand Kantronics KPC-3 packet TNC. Brisbane Area WICEN make heavy use of packet at one particular event, the International Rally of Queensland, where they use the 1200-baud network to report the scores of rally cars as they progress through each stage.

Now, I’m a newcomer to radio compared to most on the band. I got my license in 2008, and I’ve only had contact with packet for the last two years, and even then, mostly only at a distance.  I had a hand-held that did APRS, and I’ve also done some APRS using soundmodem and Xastir.  Full-blooded AX.25 has taken me some time, and I’m slowly coming to grips with some of it.

One thing I wanted to try and figure out, is how to re-lay traffic from a host connected to the RF world, to a host on a local network.  I knew there was some protocol that did it, but didn’t know what, or how it worked.  Turns out the protocol I was thinking of was AXIP, which basically overlays AX.25 frames directly atop IP.  There’s also a version that encapsulates them in UDP datagrams; AXUDP.

The following are my notes on how I managed to get some routing to happen.

So, my set-up.  I have my FT-897D set up on 145.175MHz FM, the APRS frequency in Australia.  (I did go hunting for BBSes the other night but came up blank, but since APRS uses AX.25 messaging, it’ll be a start.)

To its data port, I have the KPC-3, which connects to my trusty old P4 laptop via good ol’e RS-232 (the real stuff, not pretend USB-RS232, yes the laptop is that old).  This laptop is on my local LAN, with an IP address of 192.168.64.141.

In front of me, is my main workhorse, a MacBook at the address of 192.168.64.140.  Both laptops are booted into Linux, and my target is Xastir.

First thing I had to do was compile the AX.25 kernel modules, and the ax25-tools, ax25-apps.  The userspace tools needed for this are: ax25ipd and kissnetd.

On the RF-facing system

This is the P4 in my case, the one with the TNC. First step is to get the TNC into KISS mode. In the case of Kantronics TNCs, the way to do this is to fire up your terminal emulator and run int kiss followed by reset.

Important note: to get it back, shut down everything using the serial port then run echo -e '\0300\0377\0300' > /dev/ttyS0. This sends the three-byte exit-kiss-mode sequence (0xc0 0xff 0xc0).

Configure /etc/ax25/ax25ipd.conf. Three things you’ll need to set up:

  • mode: should be tnc
  • device: should be whatever your serial device is (more on this later)
  • your default route: this is the host that will receive ALL traffic

In my case, my ax25ipd.conf on the P4 laptop looks like this:

socket ip
mode tnc
device /dev/ttyS0
speed 9600
loglevel 2
broadcast QST-0 NODES-0
# This points to my MacBook; d means default route
route 0 192.168.64.140 d

Once done, we start the ax25ipd service as root, it should fork into the background, and checking with netstat should show it as listening on a raw socket.

On the client machine

Here, we also run a AXIP server, but this time to catch the packets that get flung our way by the other system. We want Xastir to pick up the traffic as it comes in. Two ways of doing this.

One is to configure kissattach to give us a PTY device which we then pass onto ax25ipd, then run Xastir as root and tell it to use the AX.25 stack directly. Gentoo’s Xastir ebuild ships with this feature disabled, so not an option here (unless I hack the ebuild like I did last time).

The AX.25 tools also come with kissnetd: this basically generates several PTYs and links them all together so they all see eachother’s KISS traffic. So ax25ipd will receive packets, pass them to its PTY, which will then get forwarded by kissnetd to the other PTY attached to Xastir.

There is one catch. Unlike in kernels of yore, kernel 2.6 and above (3.x is no exception) do not have statically configured PTY devices. So all the AX.25 docs that say to use /dev/ptyq0 for one end and /dev/ttyqf for the other? Make that /dev/ptmx for one end, and the tool will tell you, what the other end is called. And yes, it’ll change.

Run kissnetd -p 2; the parameter tells it to create two PTYs. The tool will run in the foreground so make a note of what they’re called, then hit CTRL-Z followed by bg to bring it into the background.

vk4msl-mb stuartl # kissnetd -p 2
kissnetd V 1.5 by Frederic RIBLE F1OAT - ATEPRA FPAC/Linux Project

Awaiting client connects on:
/dev/pts/1 /dev/pts/4
^Z
[1]+  Stopped                 kissnetd -p 2
vk4msl-mb stuartl # bg 1

Now, in this example, PTYs 1 and 4 are allocated. I can allocate either one of them to Xastir or ax25ipd, here I’ll use /dev/pts/4 for ax25ipd and the other for Xastir. It is possibly best if you make symlinks to these, and just refer to the symlinks in your software.

# ln -s /dev/pts/4 /dev/kiss-ax25ipd
# ln -s /dev/pts/1 /dev/kiss-xastir

Whilst you’re at it, change the ownership of the one you give to Xastir to your user/group so Xastir doesn’t need to run as root.

Set up /etc/ax25/ax25ipd.conf on the client. Here, I’ve given it a route for all WIDE* traffic to the other host. It might be possible to just use 0 as I did before, I wasn’t sure if that’d create a loop or not.

socket ip
mode tnc
device /dev/kiss-ax25ipd
speed 9600
loglevel 2
broadcast QST-0 NODES-0
# This points to my P4, attached to the TNC; d means default route
route WIDE* 192.168.64.141 d

Now start up ax25ipd and Xastir, you should be able to bring up the interface and see APRS traffic, more over, you should be able to hit Transmit and see the TNC broadcast your packets.

Some stations visible direct via RF

Some stations visible direct via RF (click to enlarge)