May 032015
 

The Problem

I’ve been running a station from the bicycle for some time now and I suppose I’ve tried a few different battery types on the station.

Originally I ran 9Ah 12V gel cells, which work fine for about 6 months, then the load of the radio gets a bit much and I find myself taking two with me on a journey to work because one no longer lasts the day.  I replaced this with a 40Ah Thundersky LiFePO4 pack which I bought from EVWorks, which while good, weighed 8kg!  This is a lot lighter than an equivalent lead acid, gel cell or AGM battery, but it’s still a hefty load for a bicycle.

At the time that was the smallest I could get.  Eventually I found a mob that sold 10Ah packs. These particular cells were made by LiFeBatt, and while pricey, I’ve pretty much recouped my costs. (I’d have bought and disposed of about 16 gel cell batteries in this time at $50 each, versus $400 for one of these.)   These are what I’ve been running now since about mid 2011, and they’ve been pretty good for my needs.  They handle the load of the FT-857 okay on 2m FM which is what I use most of the time.

A week or two back though, I was using one of these packs outside with the home base in a “portable” set-up with my FT-897D.  Tuned up on the 40m WICEN net on 7075kHz, a few stations reported that I had scratchy audio.  Odd, the radio was known to be good, I’ve operated from the back deck before and not had problems, what changed?

The one and only thing different is I was using one of these 10Ah packs.  I’ve had fun with RF problems on the bicycle too.  On transmit, the battery was hovering around the 10.2V mark, perhaps a bit low.  Could it be the radio is distorting on voice peaks due to input current starvation?  I tried after the net swapping it for my 40Ah pack, which improved things.  Not totally cleared up, but it was better, and the pack hadn’t been charged in a while so it was probably a little low too.

The idea

I thought about the problem for a bit.  SSB requires full power on voice peaks.  For a 100W radio, that’s a 20A load right now.  Batteries don’t like this.  Perhaps there was a bit of internal resistance from age and the nature of the cells?  Could I do something to give it a little hand?

Supercapacitors are basically very high capacity electrolytic capacitors with a low breakdown voltage, normally in the order of a few volts and capacitances of over a farad.  They are good for temporarily storing charge that needs to be dumped into a load in a hurry.  Could this help?

My cells are in a series bank of 4: ~3.3V/cell with 4 cells gives me 13.2V.  There’s a battery balancer already present.  If a cell gets above 4V, that cell is toast, so the balancer is present to try to prevent that from happening.  I could buy these 1F 5.5V capacitors for only a few dollars each, so I thought, “what the hell, give it a try”.  I don’t have much information on them other that Elna Japan made them.  The plan was to make some capacitor “modules” that would hook in parallel to each cell.

My 13.2V battery pack, out of case

My 13.2V battery pack, out of its case

Supercapacitors

Supercapacitors

For my modules, the construction was simple, two reasonably heavy gauge wires tacked onto the terminals, the whole capacitor then encased in heatshrink tubing and ring lugs crimped to the leads. I was wondering whether I should solder a resistor and diode in parallel and put that in series with the supercap to prevent high in-rush current, but so far that hasn’t been necessary.

The re-assembled pack

I’ve put the pack back together and so far, it has charged up and is ready to face its first post-retrofit challenge.  I guess I’ll be trying out the HF station tomorrow to see how it goes.

Assembled pack

Assembled pack

The Verdict

Not a complete solution to the RF feedback, it seems to help in other ways. I did a quick test on the drive way first with the standard Yaesu handmic and with the headset. Headset still faces interference problems on HF, but I can wind it up to about 30W~40W now instead of 20.

More pondering to come but we’ll see what the other impacts are.