Mar 282018
 

So tonight I finally got my shiny new power supply installed.

Tuesday night I took it with me along with a cable gland to HSBNE with three items on my agenda:

  • Hooking up a mains power lead to the power input.
  • Getting the newly hooked up lead inspected for electrical safety.
  • Putting some sort of cover over the screw terminals to prevent accidental contact.

I did some digging around in the HSBNE bone yard, and managed to come out with a 10A 240V mains lead, the chassis of a Sonoff TH-10, and a bit of off-cut perspex from the laser cutter to cover the gaping hole in the TH-10 casing.

The 240V mains lead came from someone’s long abandoned project.  Not sure what it was, but it basically was housed in take away food containers, so losing its mains lead is probably a good thing!  The rest of it is there if they want it … whatever it is.

I terminated the 240V lead with fork lugs, ready to go into the screw terminals on the power supply.  A small square of perspex was cut out of the off-cut, and that was sliced into three parts to be glued to the TH-10 case.

The back panel of the TH-10 case had an opening cut in it to allow the screw terminal block to pass through the back.  One of the pieces of perspex had a 14mm hole drilled through it and the cable gland was fitted.  All that was left to do was some hot glue to fix the perspex panels into place over the hole, attach the mains lead and get it checked.

Sadly, I couldn’t find anyone about with an electrical ticket to actually install the cable, so I did that bit myself in the end.  There also weren’t any glue sticks for the glue gun around, and I still had to think about how I was going to secure the TH-10 case to the aluminium of the PSU.

I brought it into my workplace this morning and got one of the people there to check it over (there’s two at my work who have a current electrical ticket).  My cabling job was given the tick of approval, and as a bonus, we had some silicon glue which could fix the TH-10 case to the aluminium panel on the PSU.  Perfect, two birds with one stone.

Once home, I set to work on the 12V end of it.  I needed to go from 4 smallish screw terminals to an Anderson SB50 connector which was intended for 8AWG cable.  In the end, the solution was to use two lengths of twin-12AWG.  One end was terminated with fork lugs, the other was twisted together and soldered into a SB50 connector.  I had to solder it because even doubled over, it was too thin to crimp into the pins securely.

I used about 10cm of 12AWG.  To that SB-50 I made a patch lead with two SB-50s out of figure-8 8AWG cable, about 50cm long to reach the charger input on the battery bank.

I’ll put some pictures up later, but already the silence of this new charger is deafening.  It happily boosted the batteries up to 14.3V and is now letting them sit in constant voltage mode.

We shall see what happens when the sun comes up tomorrow.  Hopefully it just backs right off and lets mother nature do all the work.