Jun 202021
 

So, today on the radio I heard that from this Friday, our state government was “expanding” the use of their Check-in Queensland program. Now, since my last post on the topic, I have since procured a new tablet. The tablet was purchased for completely unrelated reasons, namely:

  1. to provide navigation assistance, current speed monitoring and positional logging whilst on the bicycle (basically, what my Garmin Rino-650 does)
  2. to act as a media player (basically what my little AGPTek R2 is doing — a device I’ve now outgrown)
  3. to provide a front-end for a SDR receiver I’m working on
  4. run Slack for monitoring operations at work

Since it’s a modern Android device, it happens to be able to run the COVID-19 check-in programs. So I have COVIDSafe and Check-in Queensland installed. For those to work though, I have to run my existing phone’s WiFi hotspot. A little cumbersome, but it works, and I get the best of both worlds: modern Android + my phone’s excellent cell tower reception capability.

The snag though comes when these programs need to access the Internet at times when using my phone is illegal. Queensland laws around mobile phone use changed a while back, long before COVID-19. The upshot was that, while people who hold “open” driver’s licenses may “use” a mobile phone (provided that they do not need to handle it to do so), anybody else may not “use” a phone for “any purpose”. So…

  • using it for talking to people? Banned. Even using “hands-free”? Yep, still banned.
  • using it for GPS navigation? Banned.
  • using it for playing music? Banned.

It’s a $1000 fine if you’re caught. I’m glad I don’t use a wheelchair: such mobility aids are classed as a “vehicle” under the Queensland traffic act, and you can be fined for “drink driving” if you operate one whilst drunk. So traffic laws that apply to “motor vehicles” also apply to non-“motor vehicles”.

I don’t have a driver’s license of any kind, and have no interest in getting one, my primary mode of private transport is by bicycle. I can’t see how I’d be granted permission to do something that someone on a learner’s permit or P1 provisional license is forbidden from doing. The fact that I’m not operating a “motor vehicle” does not save me, the drink-driving in a wheelchair example above tells me that I too, would be fined for riding my bicycle whilst drunk. Likely, the mobile phones apply to me too. Given this, I made the decision to not “use” a mobile phone on the bicycle “for any purpose”. “For any purpose” being anything that requires the device to be powered on.

If I’m going to be spending a few hours at the destination, and in a situation that may permit me to use the phone, I might carry it in the top-box turned off (not certain if this is permitted, but kinda hard to police), but if it’s a quick trip to the shops, I leave the mobile phone at home.

What’s this got to do with the Check-in Queensland application or my new shiny-shiny you ask? Glad you did.

The new tablet is a WiFi-only device… specifically because of the above restrictions on using a “mobile phone”. The day those restrictions get expanded to include the tablet, you can bet the tablet will be ditched when travelling as well. Thus, it receives its Internet connection via a WiFi access point. At home, that’s one of two Cisco APs that provide my home Internet service. No issue there.

If I’m travelling on foot, or as a passenger on someone else’s vehicle, I use the WiFi hot-spot function on my phone to provide this Internet service… but this obviously won’t work if I just ducked up the road on my bike to go get some grocery shopping done, as I leave the phone at home for legal reasons.

Now, the Check-in Queensland application does not work without an Internet connection, and bringing my own in this situation is legally problematic.

I can also think of situations where an Internet connection is likely to be problematic.

  • If your phone doesn’t have a reliable cell tower link, it won’t reliably connect to the Internet, Check-in Queensland will fail.
  • If your phone is on a pre-paid service and you run out of credit, your carrier will deny you an Internet service, Check-in Queensland will fail.
  • If your carrier has a nation-wide whoopsie (Telstra had one a couple of years back, Optus and Vodafone have had them too), you can find yourself with a very pretty but very useless brick in your hand. Check-in Queensland will fail.

What can be done about this?

  1. The venues could provide a WiFi service so people can log in to that, and be provided with limited Internet access to allow the check-in program to work whilst at the venue. I do not see this happening for most places.
  2. The Check-in Queensland application could simply record the QR code it saw, date/time, co-visitors, and simply store it on the device to be uploaded later when the device has a reliable Internet link.
  3. For those who have older phones (and can legally carry them), the requirement of an “application” seems completely unnecessary:
    1. Most devices made post-2010 can run a web browser capable of running an in-browser QR code scanner, and storage of the customer’s details can be achieved either through using window.localStorage or through RFC-6265 HTTP cookies. In the latter case, you’d store the details server-side, and generate an “opaque” token which would be stored on the device as a cookie. A dedicated program is not required to do the function that Check-in Queensland is performing.
    2. For older devices, pretty much anything that can access the 3G network can send and receive SMS messages. (Indeed, most 2G devices can… the only exception I know to this would be the Motorola MicroTAC 5200 which could receive but not send SMSes. The lack of a 2G network will stop you though.) Telephone carriers are required to capture and verify contact details when provisioning pre-paid and post-paid cellular services, so already have a record of “who” has been assigned which telephone number. So why not get people to text the 6-digit code that Check-In Queensland uses, to a dedicated telephone number? If there’s an outbreak, they simply contact the carrier (or the spooks in Canberra) to get the contact details.
  4. The Check-in Queensland application has a “business profile” which can be used for manual entry of a visitor’s details… hypothetically, why not turn this around? Scan a QR code that the visitor carries and provides. Such QR codes could be generated by the Check-in Queensland website, printed out on paper, then cut out to make a business-card sized code which visitors can simply carry in their wallets and present as needed. No mobile phone required! For the record, the Electoral Commission of Queensland has been doing this for our state and council elections for years.

It seems the Queensland Government is doing this fancy “app” thing “because we can”. Whilst I respect the need to effectively contact-trace, the truth is there’s no technical reason why “this” must be the implementation. We just seem to be playing a game of “follow the shepherd”. They keep trying to advertise how “smart” we are, why not prove it?

Jun 092021
 

So, I finally had enough with the Epson WF7510 we have which is getting on in years, occasionally miss-picks pages, won’t duplex, and has a rather curious staircase problem when printing. We’ll keep it for A3 scanning and printing (the fax feature is now useless), but for a daily driver, I decided to make an end-of-financial-year purchase. I wanted something that met this criteria:

  • A4 paper size
  • Automatic duplex printing
  • Networked
  • Laser/LED (for water-resistant prints)
  • Colour is a “nice to have”

I looked at the mono options, but when I looked at the driver options for Linux, things were looking dire with binary blobs everywhere. Removed the restriction on it being mono, and suddenly this option appeared that was cheaper, and more open. I didn’t need a scanner (the WF7510’s scanner works fine with xsane, plus I bought a separate Canon LiDE 300 which is pretty much plug-and-play with xsane), a built-in fax is useless since we can achieve the same using hylafax+t38modem (a TO-DO item well down in my list of priorities).

The Kyocera P5021cdn allegedly isn’t the cheapest to run, but it promised a fairly pain-free experience on Linux and Unix. I figured I’d give it a shot. These are some notes I used to set the thing up. I want to move it to a different part of the network ultimately, but we’ll see what the cretinous Windows laptop my father users will let us do, for now it shares that Ethernet VLAN with the WF7510 and his laptop, and I’ll just hop over the network to access it.

Getting the printer’s IP and MAC address

The menu on the printer does not tell you this information. There is however, a Printer Status menu item in the top-panel menu. Tell it to print the status page, you’ll get a nice colour page with lots of information about the printer including its IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.

Web interface

If you want to configure the thing further, you need a web browser. Visit the printer’s IP address in your browser and you’re greeted with Command Centre RX. Out of the box, the username and password were Admin and Admin (capitalised A).

Setting up CUPS

The printer “driver” off the Kyocera website is a massive 400MB zip file, because they bundled up .deb and .rpm packages for every distribution they officially support together in one file. Someone needs to introduce them to reprepro and its dnf-equivalent. That said, you have a choice… if you pick a random .deb out of that blob, and manually unpack it somewhere (use ar x on it, you’ll see data.tar.xz or something, unpack that and you’ve got your package files), you’ll find a .ppd file you’ll need.

Or, you can do a search and realise that the Arch Linux guys have done the hard work for you. Many thanks guys (and girls… et all)!

Next puzzle is figuring out the printer URI. Turns out the printer calls itself lp1… so the IPP URI you should use is http://<IP>:631/ipp/lp1.

I haven’t put the thing fully through its paces, and I note the cartridges are down about 4% from those two prints (the status page and the CUPS test print), but often the initial cartridges are just “starter” cartridges and that the replacements often have a lot more toner in them. I guess time will tell on their longevity (and that of the imaging drum).