Jun 092021
 

So, I finally had enough with the Epson WF7510 we have which is getting on in years, occasionally miss-picks pages, won’t duplex, and has a rather curious staircase problem when printing. We’ll keep it for A3 scanning and printing (the fax feature is now useless), but for a daily driver, I decided to make an end-of-financial-year purchase. I wanted something that met this criteria:

  • A4 paper size
  • Automatic duplex printing
  • Networked
  • Laser/LED (for water-resistant prints)
  • Colour is a “nice to have”

I looked at the mono options, but when I looked at the driver options for Linux, things were looking dire with binary blobs everywhere. Removed the restriction on it being mono, and suddenly this option appeared that was cheaper, and more open. I didn’t need a scanner (the WF7510’s scanner works fine with xsane, plus I bought a separate Canon LiDE 300 which is pretty much plug-and-play with xsane), a built-in fax is useless since we can achieve the same using hylafax+t38modem (a TO-DO item well down in my list of priorities).

The Kyocera P5021cdn allegedly isn’t the cheapest to run, but it promised a fairly pain-free experience on Linux and Unix. I figured I’d give it a shot. These are some notes I used to set the thing up. I want to move it to a different part of the network ultimately, but we’ll see what the cretinous Windows laptop my father users will let us do, for now it shares that Ethernet VLAN with the WF7510 and his laptop, and I’ll just hop over the network to access it.

Getting the printer’s IP and MAC address

The menu on the printer does not tell you this information. There is however, a Printer Status menu item in the top-panel menu. Tell it to print the status page, you’ll get a nice colour page with lots of information about the printer including its IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.

Web interface

If you want to configure the thing further, you need a web browser. Visit the printer’s IP address in your browser and you’re greeted with Command Centre RX. Out of the box, the username and password were Admin and Admin (capitalised A).

Setting up CUPS

The printer “driver” off the Kyocera website is a massive 400MB zip file, because they bundled up .deb and .rpm packages for every distribution they officially support together in one file. Someone needs to introduce them to reprepro and its dnf-equivalent. That said, you have a choice… if you pick a random .deb out of that blob, and manually unpack it somewhere (use ar x on it, you’ll see data.tar.xz or something, unpack that and you’ve got your package files), you’ll find a .ppd file you’ll need.

Or, you can do a search and realise that the Arch Linux guys have done the hard work for you. Many thanks guys (and girls… et all)!

Next puzzle is figuring out the printer URI. Turns out the printer calls itself lp1… so the IPP URI you should use is http://<IP>:631/ipp/lp1.

I haven’t put the thing fully through its paces, and I note the cartridges are down about 4% from those two prints (the status page and the CUPS test print), but often the initial cartridges are just “starter” cartridges and that the replacements often have a lot more toner in them. I guess time will tell on their longevity (and that of the imaging drum).