Sep 102017
 

… Come now, Microsoft… are you telling me your operating system just makes up its own error codes?  How can the error code be “unknown”?  The computer is doing what you told it to do!

Moreover, why can’t you fix your broken links?  Clearly the error I’m getting is not any of the ones you’ve listed, so why even offer them as suggestions?

Aug 132016
 

Sometimes I wonder.  Take this evening for example.

I recently purchased some microcontrollers to evaluate for a project, some Atmel ATTiny85s, because they have a rather nice PLL function which means they can do VHF-speed PWM, and some NXP LPC810s, because they happen to be the only DIP-package ARM chip on the market I know of.

The project I’m looking at is a re-work of my bicycle horn… the ATMega32U4 works well, but the LeoStick boards are expensive compared to a bare DIP MCU, and the wiring inside the original prototype is a mess.  I also never got USB working on them, so there’s no point in a USB-capable MCU.

I initially got ATMega1284s owing to the flash storage, but these being 40-pin DIPs, they’re bigger than anticipated, and the fact they’ve got dual USARTs, lots of GPIOs and plenty of storage space, I figured I’d put them aside for another project.

What to use?  Well I have some AT89C2051s from way back (but no programmer for them), some ATTiny24As which I bought for my solar cluster project, an ATMega8L from another project, a LeoStick (Arduino Leonardo clone).  The LeoStick I’m in the process of turning into a debugWire debugger so that I can figure out what the ADCs are doing in my cluster’s power controller (ATTiny24A).

I started building a programmer for the ‘2051s using my ATMega8L last weekend.  The MAX232 IC I grabbed for serial I/O was giving me jibberish, and today I confirmed it was misbehaving.  The board in general is misbehaving in that after flashing the MCU, it seems to stay in reset, so I’ve got more work to do.  If I got that going, I was thinking I could have PCM recordings in an I²C EEPROM and use port 1 on the ‘2051 with an R2R ladder DAC to play sound.  (These chips do not feature PWM.)

Thinking this morning, I thought the LPC810 might be worth a shot.  It only has 4kB of flash, half that of the ATTiny85, and doesn’t have as impressive PWM capabilities, but is good enough.  I really need about 16kB to store the waveforms in flash.  I do have some I²C EEPROMs, mostly <2kB ones that are sourced off old motherboards, but also a handful of 32kB ones that I had just bought especially for this… but then left behind on my desk at work.

I considered audio compression, and experimenting with ADPCM-style techniques, came to the conclusion that I didn’t like the reduced audio quality.  It really sounded harsh.  (Okay, I realise 4-bits per sample is never going to win over the audiophiles!)

Maybe instead of PCM, I could do a crude polyphonic synthesizer?  My horn effect is in fact synthesized using a Python script: the same can be done in C, and the chip probably has the CPU grunt to do it.  It’d save the flash space as I’d be basically doing “poor man’s MIDI” on the thing.  Similar has been done before on lesser hardware.

I did some rough design of data structures.  I figured out a data structure that would allow me to store the state of a “voice” in 8 bytes, and could describe note and timing events in 8-byte blocks.  So in a 2kB EEPROM, I’d store 256 notes, and could easily accommodate 8 or 16 voices in RAM, provided the CPU could keep up at 30MHz.

So, I pull a chip out, slap it in my breadboard, and start hooking it up to power, and to my shiny new USB-TTL serial cable.  Fire up lpc21isp and, nothing, no response from the chip.  Huh?  Check wiring, probe around, still nothing.  Tried different baud rates, etc.  No dice.

This stubborn chip was not going to talk to lpc21isp.  Okay, let’s see if it’ll do SWD.  I dig out my STLink/V2 and hook that up.

OpenOCD reports no response from the device.

Great, maybe a dud chip.  After a good hour or so of fruitless poking and prodding, I pull it out of the breadboard and go to get another from the tube it came from when I notice “Atmel” written on the tube.

I look closer at the chip: it was an ATTiny85!  Different pin-out, different ISP procedure, and even if the .hex file had uploaded, it almost certainly would not have executed.

Swap the chip for an actual LPC810, and OpenOCD reports:

Open On-Chip Debugger 0.10.0-dev-00120-g7a8915f (2015-11-25-18:49)
Licensed under GNU GPL v2
For bug reports, read
http://openocd.org/doc/doxygen/bugs.html
Info : auto-selecting first available session transport "hla_swd". To override use 'transport select '.
Info : The selected transport took over low-level target control. The results might differ compared to plain JTAG/SWD
adapter speed: 10 kHz
adapter_nsrst_delay: 200
Info : Unable to match requested speed 10 kHz, using 5 kHz
Info : Unable to match requested speed 10 kHz, using 5 kHz
Info : clock speed 5 kHz
Info : STLINK v2 JTAG v23 API v2 SWIM v4 VID 0x0483 PID 0x3748
Info : using stlink api v2
Info : Target voltage: 2.979527
Warn : UNEXPECTED idcode: 0x0bc11477
Error: expected 1 of 1: 0x0bb11477
in procedure 'init'
in procedure 'ocd_bouncer'

I haven’t figured out the cause of this yet, whether the ST programmer doesn’t like talking to a competitor’s part. It’d be nice to get SWD going since single-stepping code and peering into memory really spoils a developer like myself. I try lpc21isp again.

Success!  I see a LED blinking, consistent with the demo .hex file I loaded.  Of course now the next step is to try building my own, but at least I can load code onto the device now.

Apr 272016
 

It seems good old “common courtesy” is absent without leave, as is “common sense”. Some would say it’s been absent for most of my lifetime, but to me it seems particularly so of late.

In particular, where it comes to the safety of one’s self, and to others, people don’t seem to actually think or care about what they are doing, and how that might affect others. To say it annoys me is putting it mildly.

In February, I lost a close work colleague in a bicycle accident. I won’t mention his name, as I do not have his family’s permission to do so.

I remember arriving at my workplace early on Friday the 12th before 6AM, having my shower, and about 6:15 wandering upstairs to begin my work day. Reaching my desk, I recall looking down at an open TS-7670 industrial computer and saying out aloud, “It’s just you and me, no distractions, we’re going to get U-Boot working”, before sitting down and beginning my battle with the machine.

So much for the “no distractions” however. At 6:34AM, the office phone rings. I’m the only one there and so I answer. It was a social worker looking for “next of kin” details for a colleague of mine. Seems they found our office details via a Cab Charge card they happened to find in his wallet.

Well, first thing I do is start scrabbling for the office directory to get his home number so I can pass the bad news onto his wife only to find: he’s only listed his mobile number. Great. After getting in contact with our HR person, we later discover there isn’t any contact details in the employee records either. He was around before such paperwork existed in our company.

Common sense would have dictated that one carry an “in case of emergency” number on a card in one’s wallet! At the very least let your boss know!

We find out later that morning that the crash happened on a particularly sharp bend of the Go Between Bridge, where the offramp sweeps left to join the Bicentennial bikeway. It’s a rather sharp bend that narrows suddenly, with handlebar-height handrails running along its length and “Bicycle Only” signs clearly signposted at each end.

Common sense and common courtesy would suggest you slow down on that bridge as a cyclist. Common sense and common courtesy would suggest you use the other side as a pedestrian. Common sense would question the utility of hand rails on a cycle path.

In the meantime our colleague is still fighting for his life, and we’re all holding out hope for him as he’s one of our key members. As for me, I had a network to migrate that weekend. Two of us worked the Saturday and Sunday.

Sunday evening, emotions hit me like a freight train as I realised I was in denial, and realised the true horror of the situation.

We later find out on the Tuesday, our colleague is in a very bad way with worst-case scenario brain damage as a result of the crash. From shining light to vegetable, he’d never work for us again.

Wednesday I took a walk down to the crash site to try and understand what happened. I took a number of photographs, and managed to speak to a gentleman who saw our colleague being scraped off the pavement. Even today, some months later, the marks on the railings (possibly from handlebar grips) and a large blood smear on the path itself, can still be seen.

It was apparent that our colleague had hit this railing at some significant speed. He wasn’t obese, but he certainly wasn’t small, and a fully grown adult does not ricochet off a metal railing and slide face-first for over a metre without some serious kinetic energy involved.

Common sense seems to suggest the average cyclist goes much faster than the 20km/hr collision the typical bicycle helmet is designed for under AS/NZS 2063:2008.

I took the Thursday and Friday off as time-in-lieu for the previous weekend, as I was an emotional wreck. The following Tuesday I resumed cycling to work, and that morning I tried an experiment to reproduce the crash conditions. The bicycle I ride wasn’t that much different to his, both bikes having 29″ wheels.

From what I could gather that morning, it seemed he veered right just prior to the bend then lost control, listing to the right at what I estimated to be about a 30° angle. What caused that? We don’t know. It’s consistent with him dodging someone or something on the path — but this is pure speculation on my part.

Mechanical failure? The police apparently have ruled that out. There’s not much in the way of CCTV cameras in the area, plenty on the pedestrian side, not so much on the cycle side of the bridge.

Common sense would suggest relying on a cyclist to remember what happened to them in a crash is not a good plan.

In any case, common sense did not win out that day. Our colleague passed away from his injuries a little over a fortnight after his crash, aged 46. He is sadly missed.

I’ve since made a point of taking my breakfast down to that point where the bridge joins the cycleway. It’s the point where my colleague had his last conscious thoughts.

Over the course of the last few months, I’ve noticed a number of things.

Most cyclists sensibly slow down on that bend, but a few race past at ludicrous speed. One morning, I nearly thought they’d be an encore performance as two construction workers on City Cycle bikes, sans helmets, came careening around the corner, one almost losing it.

Then I see the pedestrians. There’s a well lit, covered walkway, on the opposite side of the bridge for pedestrian use. It has bench seats, drinking fountains, good lighting, everything you’d want as a pedestrian. Yet, some feel it is not worth the personal exertion to take the 100m extra distance to make use of it.

Instead, they show a lack of courtesy by using the bicycle path. Walking on a bicycle path isn’t just dangerous to the pedestrian like stepping out onto a road, it’s dangerous for the cyclist too!

If a car hits a pedestrian or cyclist, the damage to the occupants of the car is going to be minimal to nonexistent, compared to what happens to the cyclist or pedestrian. If a cyclist or motorcyclist hits a pedestrian however, they surround the frame, thus hit the ground first. Possibly at significant speed.

Yet, pedestrians think it is acceptable to play Russian roulette with their own lives and the lives of every cycle user by continuing to walk where it is not safe for them to go. They’d never do it on a motorway, but somehow a bicycle path is considered fair game.

Most pedestrians are understanding, I’ve politely asked a number to not walk on the bikeway, and most oblige after I point out how they get to the pedestrian walkway.

Common sense would suggest some signage on where the pedestrian can walk would be prudent.

However, I have had at least two that ignored me, one this morning telling me to “mind my own shit”. Yes mate, I am minding “my own shit” as you put it: I’m trying to stop the hypothetical me from possibly crashing into the hypothetical you!

It’s this sort of reaction that seems symbolic of the whole “lack of common courtesy” that abounds these days.

It’s the same attitude that seems to hint to people that it’s okay to park a car so that it blocks the footpath: newsflash, it’s not! I know of one friend of mine who frequently runs into this problem. He’s in a wheelchair — a vehicle not known for its off-road capabilities or ability to squeeze past the narrow gap left by a car.

It seems the drivers think it’s acceptable to force footpath users of all types, including the elderly, the young and the disabled, to “step out” onto the road to avoid the car that they so arrogantly parked there. It makes me wonder how many people subsequently become disabled as a result of a collision caused by them having to step around such obstacles. Would the owner of the parked car be liable?

I don’t know, I’m no lawyer, but I should think they should carry some responsibility!

In Queensland, pedestrians have right-of-way on the footpath. That includes cyclists: cyclists of all ages are allowed there subject to council laws and signage — but once again, they need to give way. In other words, don’t charge down the path like a lunatic, and don’t block it!

No doubt, the people who I’m trying to convince are too arrogant to care about the above, and what their actions might have on others. Still, I needed to get the above off my chest!

Nothing will bring my colleague back, a fact that truly pains me, and I’ve learned some valuable lessons about the sort of encouragement I give people. I regret not telling him to slow down, 5 minutes longer wouldn’t have killed him, and I certainly did not want a race! Was he trying to race me so he could keep an eye on me? I’ll never know.

He was a bright person though, it is proof though that even the intelligent among us are prone to possibly doing stupid things. With thrills come spills, and one might question whether one’s commute to work is the appropriate venue for such thrills, or whether those can wait for another time.

I for one have learned that it does not pay to be the hare, thus I intend to just enjoy the ride for what it is. No need to rush, common sense tells me it just isn’t worth it!

Nov 242015
 

Some time back, Lenovo made the news with the Superfish fiasco.  Superfish was a piece of software that intercepted HTTPS connections by way of a trusted root certificate installed on the machine.  When the software detected a browser attempting to make a HTTPS connection, it would intercept it and connect on that software’s behalf.

When Superfish negotiated the connection, it would then generate on-the-fly a certificate for that website which it would then present to the browser.  This allowed it to spy on the web page content for the purpose of advertising.

Now Dell have been caught shipping an eDellRoot certificate on some of its systems.  Both laptops and desktops are affected.  This morning I checked the two newest computers in our office, both Dell XPS 8700 desktops running Windows 7.  Both had been built on the 13th of October, and shipped to us.  They both arrived on the 23rd of October, and they were both taken out of their boxes, plugged in, and duly configured.

I pretty much had two monitors and two keyboards in front of me, performing the same actions on both simultaneously.

Following configuration, one was deployed to a user, the other was put back in its box as a spare.  This morning I checked both for this certificate.  The one in the box was clean, the deployed machine had the certificate present.

Dell's dodgy certificate in action

Dell’s dodgy certificate in action

How do you check on a Dell machine?

A quick way, is to hit Logo+R (Logo = “Windows Key”, “Command Key” on Mac, or whatever it is on your keyboard, some have a penguin) then type certmgr.msc and press ENTER. Under “Trusted Root Certificate Store”, look for “eDellRoot”.

Another way is, using IE or Chrome, try one of the following websites:

(Don’t use Firefox: it has its own certificate store, thus isn’t affected.)

Removal

Apparently just deleting the certificate causes it to be re-installed after reboot.  qasimchadhar posted some instructions for removal, I’ll be trying these shortly:

You get rid of the certificate by performing following actions:

  1. Stop and Disable Dell Foundations Service
  2. Delete eDellRoot CA registry key here
    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\SystemCertificates\ROOT\Certificates\98A04E4163357790C4A79E6D713FF0AF51FE6927
  3. Then reboot and test.

Future recomendations

It is clear that the manufacturers do not have their user’s interests at heart when they ship Windows with new computers.  Microsoft has recognised this and now promote signature edition computers, which is a move I happen to support.  HOWEVER this should be standard not an option.

There are two reasons why third-party software should not be bundled with computers:

  1. The user may not have a need or use for, the said software, either not requiring its functionality or preferring an alternative.
  2. All non-trivial software is a potential security attack vector and must be kept up to date.  The version released on the OEM image is guaranteed to be at least months old by the time your machine arrives at your door, and will almost certainly be out-of-date when you come to re-install.

So we wind up either spending hours uninstalling unwanted or out-of-date crap, or we spend hours obtaining a fresh clean non-OEM installation disc, installing the bare OS, then chasing up drivers, etc.

This assumes the OEM image is otherwise clean.  It is apparent though that more than just demo software is being loaded on these machines, malware is being shipped.

With Dell and Lenovo now both in on this act, it’s now a question of if we can trust OEM installs.  Evidence seems to suggest that no, we can no longer trust such images, and have to consider all OS installations not done by the end user as suspect.

The manufacturers have abused our trust.  As far as convenience goes, we have been had.  It is clear that an OEM-supplied operating system does not offer any greater convenience to the end user, and instead, puts them at greater risk of malware attack.  I think it is time for this practice to end.

If manufacturers are unwilling to provide machines with images that would comply with Microsoft’s signature edition requirements, then they should ship the computer with a completely blank hard drive (or SSD) and unmodified installation media for a technically competent person (of the user’s choosing) to install.

Oct 312015
 

Well, it seems the updates to Microsoft’s latest aren’t going as its maker planned. A few people have asked me about my personal opinion of this OS, and I’ll admit, I have no direct experience with it.  I also haven’t had much contact with Windows 8 either.

That said, I do keep up with the news, and a few things do concern me.

The good news

It’s not all bad of course.  Windows 8 saw a big shrink in the footprint of a typical Windows install, and Windows 10 continues to be fairly lightweight.  The UI disaster from Windows 8 has been somewhat pared back to provide a more traditional desktop with a start menu that combines features from the start screen.

There are some limitations with the new start menu, but from what I understand, it behaves mostly like the one from Windows 7.  The tiled section still has some rough edges though, something that is likely to be addressed in future updates of Windows 10.

If this is all that had changed though, I’d be happily accepting it.  Sadly, this is not the case.

Rolling-release updates

Windows has, since day one, been on a long-term support release model.  That is, they bring out a release, then they support it for X years.  Windows XP was released in 2002 and was supported until last year for example.  Windows Vista is still on extended support, and Windows 7 will enter extended support soon.

Now, in the Linux world, we’ve had both long-term support releases and rolling release distributions for years.  Most of the current Linux users know about it, and the distribution makers have had many years to get it right.  Ubuntu have been doing this since 2004, Debian since 1998 and Red Hat since 1994.  Rolling releases can be a bumpy ride if not managed correctly, which is why the long-term support releases exist.  The community has recognised the need, and meets it accordingly.

Ubuntu are even predictable with their releases.  They release on a schedule.  Anything not ready for release is pushed back to the next release.  They do a release every 6 months, in April and October and every 2 years, the April release is a long-term support release.  That is; 8.04, 10.04, 12.04, 14.04 are all LTS releases.  The LTS releases get supported for about 3 years, the regular releases about 18 months.

Debian releases are basically LTS, unless you run Debian Testing or Debian Unstable.  Then you’re running rolling-release.

Some distributions like Gentoo are always rolling-release.  I’ve been running Gentoo for more than 10 years now, and I find the rolling releases rarely give me problems.  We’ve had our hiccups, but these days, things are smooth.  Updating an older Gentoo box to the latest release used to be a fight, but these days, is comparatively painless.

It took most of that 10 years to get to that point, and this is where I worry about Microsoft forcing the vast majority of Windows users onto a rolling-release model, as they will be doing this for the first time.  As I understand it, there will be four branches:

  1. Windows Insiders programme is like Debian Unstable.  The very latest features are pushed out to them first.  They are effectively running a beta version of Windows, and can expect many updates, many breakages, lots of things changing.  For some users, this will be fine, others it’ll be a headache.  There’s no option to skip updates, but you probably will have the option of resigning from the Windows Insiders programme.
  2. Home users basically get something like Debian Testing.  After updates have been thrashed out by the insiders, it gets force-fed to the general public.  The Home version of Windows 10 will not have an option to defer an update.
  3. Professional users get something more like the standard releases of Debian.  They’ll have the option of deferring an update for up to 30 days, so things can change less frequently.  It’s still rolling-release, but they can at least plan their updates to take place once a month, hopefully without disrupting too much.
  4. Enterprise users get something like the old-stable release of Debian.  Security updates, and they have the option to defer updates for a year.

Enterprise isn’t available unless you’re a large company buying lots of licenses.  If people must buy a Windows 10 machine, my recommendation would be to go for the professional version, then you have some right of veto, as not all the updates a purely security-related, some will be changing the UI and adding/removing features.

I can see this being a major headache though for anyone who has to support hardware or software on Windows 10 however, since it’s essentially the build number that becomes important: different release builds will behave differently.  Possibly different enough that things need much more testing and maintenance than what vendors are used to.

Some are very poor at supporting Linux right now due to the rolling-release model of things like the Linux kernel, so I can see Windows 10 being a nightmare for some.

Privacy concerns

One of the big issues to be raised with Windows 10 is the inclusion of telemetry to “improve the user experience” and other features that are seen as an invasion of privacy.  Many things can be turned off, but it will take someone who’s familiar with the OS or good at researching the problem to turn them off.

Probably the biggest concern from my prospective as a network administrator is the WiFi Sense feature.  This is a feature in Windows 10 (and Windows 8 Phone), turned on by default, that allows you to share WiFi passwords with other contacts.

If one of that person’s contacts then comes into range of your AP, their device contacts Microsoft’s servers which have the password on file, and can provide it to that person’s device (hopefully in a secured manner).  The password is never shown to the user themselves, but I believe it’s only a matter of time before someone figures out how to retrieve that password from WiFi Sense.  (A rogue AP would probably do the trick.)

We have discussed this at work where we have two WiFi networks: one WPA2 enterprise one for staff, and a WPA2 Personal one for guests.  Since we cannot control whether the users have this feature turned on or not, or whether they might accidentally “share” the password with world + dog, we’re considering two options:

  1. Banning the use of Windows 10 devices (and Windows 8 Phone) from being used on our guest WiFi network.
  2. Implementing a cron job to regularly change the guest WiFi password.  (The Cisco AP we have can be hit with SSH; automating this shouldn’t be difficult.)

There are some nasty points in the end user license agreement too that seem to give Microsoft free reign to make copies of any of the data on the system.  They say personal information will be removed, but even with the best of intentions, it is likely that some personal information will get caught in the net cast by telemetry software.

Forced “upgrades” to Windows 10

This is the bit about Windows 10 that really bugs me.  Okay, Microsoft is pushing a deal where they’ll provide it to you for free for a year.  Free upgrades, yaay!  But wait: how do you know if your hardware and software is compatible?  Maybe you’re not ready to jump on the bandwagon just yet, or maybe you’ve heard news about the privacy issues or rolling release updates and decided to hold back.

Many users of Windows 7, 8 and 8.1 are now being force-fed the new release, whether we asked for it or not.

Now the problem with this is it completely ignores the fact that some do not run with an always-on Internet connection with a large quota.  I know people who only have a 3G connection, with a very small (1GB) quota.  Windows 10 weighs in at nearly 3GB, so for them, they’ll be paying for 2GB worth of overuse charges just for the OS, never mind what web browsing, emailing and other things they might have actually bought their Internet connection for.

Microsoft employees have been outed for showing such contempt before.  It seems so many there are used to the idea of an Internet connection that is always there and has a big enough quota to be considered “unlimited” that they have forgotten that some parts of the world do not have such luxuries.  The computer and the Internet are just tools: we do not buy an Internet connection just for the sake of having one.

Stopping updates

There are a couple of tools that exist for managing this.  I have not tested any of them, and cannot vouch for their safety or reliability.

  • BlockWindows (github link) is a set of scripts that, when executed, uninstall and disable most of the Windows 10-related updates on Windows 7 and 8/8.1.
  • GWX Control Panel is a (proprietary?) tool for controlling the GWX process.  The download is here.

My recommendation is to keep good backups.  Find a tool that will do a raw partition back-up of your Windows partition, and keep your personal files on a separate partition.  Then, if Microsoft does come a-knocking, you can easily roll back.  Hopefully after the “free upgrade” offer has expired (about this time next year), they will cease and desist from this practise.

Sep 262015
 

Well, a little nit I have to pick with chip manufacturers. On this occasion, it’s with ST, but they all do it, Freescale, TI, Atmel…

I’m talking about the assumptions they make about who uses their site.

Yes, I work as a “systems engineer” (really, programmer and network administrator, my role is more IT than Engineering).  However, when I’m looking at chip designs and application notes, that is usually in my recreation.

This morning, I had occasion to ask ST a question about one of their application notes.  Specifically AN3969, which deals with emulating an EEPROM using the in-built flash on a STM32F4 microcontroller.  Their “license” states:

   License

      The enclosed firmware and all the related documentation are not covered
      by a License Agreement, if you need such License you can contact your
      local STMicroelectronics office.

      THE PRESENT FIRMWARE WHICH IS FOR GUIDANCE ONLY AIMS AT PROVIDING
      CUSTOMERS WITH CODING INFORMATION REGARDING THEIR PRODUCTS IN ORDER FOR
      THEM TO SAVE TIME. AS A RESULT, STMICROELECTRONICS SHALL NOT BE HELD
      LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES WITH RESPECT
      TO ANY CLAIMS ARISING FROM THE CONTENT OF SUCH FIRMWARE AND/OR THE USE
      MADE BY CUSTOMERS OF THE CODING INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN IN
      CONNECTION WITH THEIR PRODUCTS.

Hmm, not licensed, but under a heading called “license”. Does that mean it’s public domain? Probably not. Do I treat this like MIT/BSD license? I’m looking to embed this into LGPLed firmware that will be publicly distributed: I really need an answer to this.  So over to the ST website I trundle.

I did have an account, but couldn’t think of the password.  They’ve revamped their site and I also have a new email address, so I figure, time for a new account.  I click their register link, and get this form:

ST Website registration

ST Website registration

Now, here’s where I have a gripe. Why do they always assume I am doing this for work purposes? This is something pretty much all the manufacturers do. The assumption is WRONG. My account on their website has absolutely nothing to do with my employer. I am doing this for recreation! Therefore, should not, mention them in any way.

Yet, they’re mandatory fields. I guess ST get a lot of employees of the “individual – not a company” company.

I filled out the form, got an email with a confirmation link which I click, and now this is something a lot of companies, not just chip makers, get wrong. Apart from the “wish it was” two factor (you can tell my answer was bogus), they dictate some minimum requirements, but then enforce undisclosed maximum requirements on the password.

ST Website password

ST Website password

WTF? “Special” characters? You mean like printable-ASCII characters? Or did a vertical tab slip in there somehow?  Password security, done properly, should not care how long, or how complex you choose to make your password: so long as it meets a minimum standard.  A maximum length in the order of 64 bytes or more might be reasonable, as might be a restriction to what can be typed on a “standard” US-style keyboard layout may be understandable.

In this case, the password had some punctuation characters.  Apparently these are “special”.  If they restrict them because of possible SQL injection, then I’m afraid ST, you are doing it wrong!  A base64 or hex encoded hash from something like bcrypt, PKCS12 or the like, should make such things impossible.

Obviously preventing abuse by preventing someone from using the dd-dump of a full-length Blu-ray movie as a password is perfectly acceptable, but once hashed, all passwords will be the same size and will contain no “special” characters that could upset middleware.

Sure, enforce a large maximum length (not 20 characters like eBay, but closer to 100) so that any reasonably long password won’t overflow a buffer.  Sure, enforce that some mixed character classes be used.  But don’t go telling people off for using a properly secure password!

Aug 232015
 

Something got me thinking tonight.  We were out visiting a friend of ours and it was decided we’d go out for dinner.  Nothing unusual there, and there were a few places we could have gone for a decent meal.

As it happens, we went to a bowls club for dinner.  I won’t mention which one.

Now, I’d admit that I do have a bit of a rebel streak in me.  Let’s face it, if nobody challenged the status quo, we’d still be in the trees, instead someone decided they liked the caves better and so developed modern man.

In my case, I’m not one to make a scene, but the more uptight the venue, the more uncomfortable I am being there.  If a place feels it necessary to employ a bouncer, or feels it necessary to place a big plaque out front listing rules in addition to what ought to be common sense, that starts to get the alarm bells ringing in my head.

Some rules are necessary, most of these are covered by the laws that maintain order on our streets.  In a club or restaurant, okay, you want to put some limits: someone turning up near-starkers is definitely not on.  Nobody would appreciate someone covered in grease or other muck leaving a trail throughout the place everywhere they go, nor should others be subjected to some T-shirt with text or imagery that is in any way “offencive” to the average person.

(I’ll ignore the quagmire of what people might consider offencive.  I’m sure someone would take exception to me wearing largely blank clothing.  I, for one, abhor branding or slogans on my clothing.)

Now, something that obstructs your ability to identify the said person, such as a full-face balaclava, burka (not sure how that’s spelled) or a full-face helmet: there’s quite reasonable grounds.

As for me, I never used to wear anything on my head until later in high school when I noted how much less distracted I was from overhead lighting.  I’m now so used to it, I consider myself partially undressed if I’m not wearing something.  Something just doesn’t feel right.  I don’t do it to obscure identity, if anything, it’d make me easier to identify.  (Coolie hats aren’t common in Brisbane, nor are spitfire or gatsby caps.)

It’s worth pointing out that the receptionist at this club not only had us sign in with full name and address, but also checked ID on entry.  So misbehaviour would be a pointless exercise: they already had our details, and CCTV would have shown us walking through the door.

The bit that got me with this club, was in amongst the lengthy list of things they didn’t permit, they listed “mens headwear”.  It seemed a sexist policy to me.  Apparently women’s headwear was fine, and indeed, I did see some teens wearing baseball caps as I left, no one seemed to challenge them.

In “western society”, many moons ago, it was considered “rude” for a man to wear a hat indoors.  I do not know what the rationale behind that was.  Women were exempt then from the rule, as their headwear was generally more elaborate and required greater preparation and care to put on and take off.

I have no idea whether a man would be exempt if his headgear was as difficult to remove in that time.  I certainly consider it a nuisance having to carry something that could otherwise just sit on my head and generally stay out of my way.

Today, people of both sexes, if they have anything on their head at all, it’s mostly of a unisex nature, and generally not complicated to put on or remove.  So the reasoning behind the exemption would appear to be largely moot now.

Then there’s the gender equality movement to consider.  Women for years, fought to have the same rights as men.  Today, there’s some inequality, but the general consensus seems to be that things have improved in that regard.

This said, if doing something is not acceptable for men, I don’t see how being female makes it better or worse.

Perhaps then, in the interests of equal rights, we should reconsider some of our old customs and their exemptions in the context of modern life.

May 152015
 

… or how to emulate Red Hat’s RPM dependency hell in Debian with Python.

There are times I love open source systems and times when it’s a real love-hate relationship. No more is this true than trying to build Python module packages for Debian.

On Gentoo this is easy: in the past we had g-pypi. I note that’s gone now and replaced with a gsourcery plug-in called gs-pypi. Both work. The latter is nice because it gives you an overlay potentially with every Python module.

Building packages for Debian in general is fiddly, but not difficult, but most Python packages follow the same structure: a script, setup.py, calls on distutils and provides a package builder and installer. You call this with some arguments, it builds the package, plops it in the right place for dpkg-buildpackage and the output gets bundled up in a .deb.

Easy. There’s even a helper script: stdeb that plugs into distutils and will do the Debian packaging all for you. However, stdeb will not source dependencies for you. You must do that yourself.

So quickly, building a package for Debian becomes reminiscent of re-living the bad old days with early releases of Red Hat Linux prior to yum/apt4rpm and finding the RPM you just obtained needs another that you’ll have to hunt down from somewhere.

Then you get the people who take the view, why have just one package builder when you can have two. fysom needs pybuilder to compile. No problems, I’ll just grab that. Checked it out of github, uhh ohh, it uses itself to build, and it needs other dependencies.

Lovely. It gets better though, those dependencies need pybuilder to build. I just love circular dependencies!

So as it turns out, in order to build this, you’ll need to enlist pip to install these behind Debian’s back (I just love doing that!) then you’ll have the dependencies needed to actually build pybuilder and ultimately fysom.

Your way out of this maze is to do the following:

  • Ensure you’ve got the python-stdeb, dh-python and python-pip packages installed.
  • Use pip to install the dependencies for pybuilder and its dependencies: pip install fluentmock pybuilder pyassert pyfix pybuilder-external-plugin-demo pybuilder_header_plugin pybuilder_release_plugin
  • Now you should be able to build pybuilder, do pyb publish in the directory, then look under target/dist/pybuilder-${VERSION} you should see the Python sources with a setup.py you can use with stdeb.

Any other dependencies are either in Debian repositories, or you can download the sources yourself and use the stdeb technique to build them.

Apr 112015
 

To whom it may concern,

There have been reports of web browser sessions from people outside China to websites inside China being hijacked and having malware injected.  Dubbed “Great Cannon”, this malware having the sole purpose of carrying out distributed denial of service attacks on websites that the Chinese Government attempts to censor from its people.  Whether it be the Government there itself doing this deliberately, or someone hijacking major routing equipment is fundamentally irrelevant here, either way the owner of the said equipment needs to be found, and a stop put to this malware.

I can understand you wish to prevent people within your borders from accessing certain websites, but let me make one thing abundantly clear.

COUNT ME OUT!

I will not accept my web browser which is OUTSIDE China being hijacked and used as a mule for carrying out your attacks.  It is illegal for me to carry out these attacks, and I do not authorise the use of my hardware or Internet connection for this purpose.  If this persists, I will be blocking any and all Chinese-owned websites’ executable code in my browser.

This will hurt Chinese business more than it hurts me.  If you want to ruin yourselves economically, go ahead, it’ll be like old times before the Opium Wars.

Feb 202015
 

All,

As an update on this…

Due to some issues (browser pop up behavior for example), with the Superfish Visual Discovery browser add-on, we have temporarily removed Superfish from our consumer systems until such time as Superfish is able to provide a software build that addresses these issues. As for units already in market, we have requested that Superfish auto-update a fix that addresses these issues.

To be clear, Superfish comes with Lenovo consumer products only and is a technology that helps users find and discover products visually. The technology instantly analyzes images on the web and presents identical and similar product offers that may have lower prices, helping users search for images without knowing exactly what an item is called or how to describe it in a typical text-based search engine.

The Superfish Visual Discovery engine analyzes an image 100% algorithmically, providing similar and near identical images in real time without the need for text tags or human intervention. When a user is interested in a product, Superfish will search instantly among more than 70,000 stores to find similar items and compare prices so the user can make the best decision on product and price.

Superfish technology is purely based on contextual/image and not behavioral. It does not profile nor monitor user behavior. It does not record user information. It does not know who the user is. Users are not tracked nor re-targeted. Every session is independent. When using Superfish for the first time, the user is presented the Terms of User and Privacy Policy, and has option not to accept these terms, i.e., Superfish is then disabled.

Mark Hopkins, Lenovo Support

That’s alright Mark, I’ve permanently removed Lenovo from my list of future suppliers. If I buy a Lenovo product, I’m going to insist the machine is delivered to me completely formatted of hardware and supplied with media to do a clean installation since it is clear you cannot be trusted to put an OS on a computer and not botch it in some manner.

I think there should be a law against this sort of bundling: too long machines have been delivered with crippling bloatware that either wastes system resources, causes security headaches or both. Sure, bundle some software, BUT ASK THE CUSTOMER BEFORE YOU INSTALL IT!