Nov 212018
 

Thinking about the routing problem a little more… if I wanted to do a purely “native” routing scheme not involving Net/ROM routing update broadcasts, one has to wonder what such a system would look like.

Net/ROM L3 is really just intended to “bootstrap” things… there’s the prospect of using Net/ROM L4 for tunnelling TCP traffic, but really it’s the L3 part that interests me as a way of hopping between fragments of the mesh that may be linkable via a non-6LoWHAM capable digipeater.

Net/ROM’s periodic broadcasts are inefficient, divulging a node’s entire routing table is not an ideal situation.  So what’s the alternative?  IPv6 nodes already send a “neighbour discovery” packet when they don’t know the MAC address of a neighbour, this is a trigger for a “neighbour advertisement” response.

I’m thinking 6LoWHAM will send NAs periodically anyway.  ACMA rules require identifying every 10 minutes.  Since the NA will include the call-sign of the station (in bit-shifted ASCII), doing that every 10 minutes takes care of the ACMA requirement.  An IPv6 NA message is not a big payload.

Given this will be sent to the ff02::1 multicast group, all nodes able to hear the beaconing station will receive it.  Unlike a IEEE 802.11 or 802.3 network though, not all nodes on the mesh will hear it.

The same is true of ND messages.  If the neighbour is in ear-shot and able to respond, it likely will, but that isn’t a guarantee.  Something in the link-local scope will likely be the answer, probably a daemon listening on a UDP port and sending to the ff02::1 group.

Unicast routing

When a station wishes to make contact with a station that’s not an immediate neighbour, I’m thinking of a broadcast similar to how APRS does things.  APRS uses special call-signs WIDEn-m, where the hop-limit is encoded in those messages.

A UDP message would be constructed asking “Who can reach X within N hops?” and sent to ff02::1 to some “well-known” port.

The first second is reserved for responses from nodes that know a route, either through Net/ROM, or maybe they’ve been in contact with that station before.  They respond something along the lines of “X via A,B,C, quality Q”, where A, B, C are digipeaters and Q is some link quality value.

Not sure how I’ll derive Q just yet.  Possibly based on packet loss… we’ll think of something.

If no responses are heard, the routers that heard the message re-broadcast it and listen for replies.  In the re-broadcast, each router appends its 48-bit 6LoWHAM address and a link quality to the message payload.  The hop limit would also get decremented.  That way, it can break cycles, and it gives a direct unicast path for the distant node to respond.

The same algorithm applies: wait a second for immediate responses, then any routers downstream append their addresses/link quality values, decrement the hop limit, and re-broadcast.

Again, any node that overhears the message (including the target node), may respond.  It does so via a direct unicast, sent using conventional AX.25 digipeating.  Any router en route that relays the message may also cache the result.  The “mesh” gets to learn of where everyone is as-required rather than by default with Net/ROM.

If the hop limit reaches zero, no further re-broadcasts are made, the message stops there.

When the source node hears the replies, each reply resets a 100msec timer.  100msec after the last reply, it chooses three “best” routes, and sends a ICMPv6 ND message via each one to the target station.  The station replies to all three back via those routes with an ICMPv6 NA.  If a message is lost via one of those routes, that route is demoted in quality.

Once replies have arrived back at the source, it picks the best route based on the updated quality information, and begins communications via that route.

Multicast routing

This, is more tricky.  I think the link-local should mean what it means on Thread… that is ff02::/16 just gets processed by immediate neighbours that are in direct RF range.

Realm-local (RFC-7346), ff03::/16 should be used for stuff that’s mesh-wide.  Those messages may be repeated by routers provided those routers have at least one subscriber for the given multicast group/port listening.

Multicast Listener Discovery looks to be the tool for that, although it could do with some 6LoWPAN-style optimisation.

I’m thinking the first time a router hears a datagram destined for a particular group, it should send a query out asking “who is listening” to the said group.

Following that first message, it should be up to the downstream node to inform the local routers that it intends to receive messages from a given group.  This should be periodic, maybe hourly, so that routers are not re-broadcasting messages for a node that has gone off-air.

Routers that have no listeners for a group, do not rebroadcast that group’s traffic.  Similarly, if the hop limit has been exhausted, the messages do not get rebroadcast.

Nov 172018
 

Today, I decided to get cuddly with the relevant RFCs and see if I could adapt them into something that would work for AX.25. The following roughly describes how one might stuff IPv6 datagrams into AX.25.

Much of this is heavily influenced by RFC-4944 and RFC-6282, the latter of which looks to be the heart-and-soul of Thread.


Stateless Automatic Addressing

We have a mechanism by which an AX.25 call+SSID can be losslessly mapped to a 48-bit MAC address. This is built on Radix-50 and can work as a stand-in for the EUI-48. The pseudo EUI-48 procedure mentioned in section 6 of the RFC-4944 standard is not required.

An EUI-64 is generated from an EUI-48 by chopping the EUI-48 in half and inserting the bytes ff:fe in the middle. So the EUI-48:

00:11:22:33:44:55

becomes the following EUI-64:

00:11:22:ff:fe:33:44:55

SLAAC therefore will work the same way it does for Ethernet.

Frame format

1. AX.25 UI Frame header

Size: (17 + (D*7) bytes, where D is the number of digipeaters being used

  • PID = 1100 0101 (tentative) IPv6
  • Control = 0000 0011
    • Frame type: UI, P/F = 0 (final)
  • Must contain source and destination AX.25 callsigns, may contain up to 8 digipeater AX.25 callsigns.

For a direct station-to-station contact:

  0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
├───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
│       AX.25 Flag (0x7e)       │ Destination AX.25 Call+SSID   │
├───────────────────────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┤
│ Source AX.5 Call+SSID                                         │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┬───────────────────────────────┤
│                               │          AX.25 PID            │
├───────────────────────────────┴───────────────────────────────┤
╎             AX.25 UI frame payload starts here                ╎
└╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌┘

or for contact via a few digipeaters:

  0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
├───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
│       AX.25 Flag (0x7e)       │ Destination AX.25 Call+SSID   │
├───────────────────────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┤
│ Source AX.5 Call+SSID                                         │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┬───────────────────────────────┤
│                               │    Digipeater 1 Call+SSID     │
├───────────────────────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┤
│ Digipeater 2 Call+SSID                                        │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┬───────────────────────────────┤
│                               │          AX.25 PID            │
├───────────────────────────────┴───────────────────────────────┤
╎             AX.25 UI frame payload starts here                ╎
└╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌┘

2. Mesh Addressing Header

To be used when two stations are not able to directly communicate, or when multicasting.

In this scenario, the AX.25 frame source and destination indicate the addresses of the directly-communicating nodes (e.g. source and digipeater, intermediate digipeaters, or digipeater and destination), and the fields given here will be the addresses of the source and destination AX.25 stations.

e.g. sending from VK4MSL-0 to VK4MDL-9 via
VK4RZB-0 and VK4RZA-0:

  1. First transmission:
    • AX.25 Src: VK4MSL-0
    • AX.25 Dst: VK4RZB-0
    • Mesh Src: VK4MSL-0
    • Mesh Dst: VK4MDL-9
    • Hops: 7
  2. Intermediate hop:
    • AX.25 Src: VK4RZB-0
    • AX.25 Dst: VK4RZA-0
    • Mesh Src: VK4MSL-0
    • Mesh Dst: VK4MDL-9
    • Hops: 6
  3. Final delivery:
    • AX.25 Src: VK4RZA-0
    • AX.25 Dst: VK4MDL-9
    • Mesh Src: VK4MSL-0
    • Mesh Dst: VK4MDL-9
    • Hops: 5

Unlike 802.15.4, we do not have 16-bit short addresses. Since these bits would otherwise always be set to 0, we will use these to provide a 6-bit “hops left” field. We shall use the value 63 (0x3f) to indicate when there are 63 or more hops remaining.

We will use the raw 48-bit addresses here. In keeping with amateur radio conventions, the source and destinations are flipped compared to RFC-4944.

Header format (13 bytes):

  0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
├───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
│ 1   0 │       Hops Left       │      Destination Address      │
├───────┴───────────────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┬───────────────────────────────┤
│                               │         Source Address        │
├───────────────────────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
│                                                               │
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┬───────────────────────────────┤
│                               │    Remaining AX.25 Payload    │
├───────────────────────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
╎                                                               ╎
└╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌┘

4. Fragmentation header

To be used when a IPv6 datagram is greater than L bytes, where L may be defined to be between 64 and 216 bytes.

This part is identical to that of RFC-4944 (section 5.3). I’ll come back to this bit.

5. IPv6 datagram

This can be encoded in a number of ways depending on requirements:

5.1. Raw IPv6 datagram

  0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
├───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
│ 0   1 │       6LP_IPV6        │                               │
├───────┴───────────────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
╎                  Raw IPv6 datagram with payload.              ╎
└╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌┘

6LP_IPV6 is the value 0x01, as per RFC-4944. The IPv6 datagram is encoded as per RFC-2460, and includes its payload.

The AX.25 frame is finished off with the frame-check sequence.

5.2. Compressed IPv6 datagram

In this format, the datagram fields are compressed, either through making static assumptions, or by deriving them from things such as the AX.25 header, or a previously agreed-to context.

The first field in such payloads is the 6LP_IPHC field:

  0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
├───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
│ 0   1   1 │               6LP_IPV6 with CID=1                 │
├───────────┴───────────────────┬───────────────────────────────┤
│        Context ID Byte        │                               │
├───────────────────────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
╎             Compressed IPv6 datagram with payload.            ╎
└╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌┘

or without the context ID

  0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
├───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
│ 0   1   1 │               6LP_IPV6 with CID=0                 │
├───────────┴───────────────────────────────────────────────────┤
╎             Compressed IPv6 datagram with payload.            ╎
└╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌┘

The 6LP_IPHC field is a 13-bit field, optionally followed by a context ID extension byte. The bit allocations are as follows:

  0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12
├───┴───┼───┼───┴───┼───┼───┼───┴───┴───┼───┼───┼───┤
│  TF   │ NH│ HLIM  │CID│SAC│  SAM      │ M │DAC│DAM│
└───────┴───┴───────┴───┴───┴───────────┴───┴───┴───┘
  • (MSB) 0-1: TF Traffic Class, Flow Label. See 5.2.1 below.
  • 2: NH Next Header encoding
    • =0: Given explicitly
    • =1: Encoded using 6LP_NHC
  • 3-4: HLIM Hop Limit
    • =00: Given explicitly
    • =01: is set to 1
    • =10: is set to 64
    • =11: is set to 255
  • 5: CID Context Identifier Extension
    • =0: No CID byte follows
    • =1: A CID byte follows
  • 6-8: SAC Source Address Compression / SAM Mode
    • =000: No compression applied, whole address given
    • =001: Prefix is link-local prefix, remaining bits are given.
    • =x10: Not used in 6LoWHAM (we don’t support 16-bit addresses)
    • =011: Prefix is link-local, figure the rest out from the source address in the AX.25 header.
    • =100: Unspecified address ::
    • =101: See the context for the prefix, remaining bits are given.
    • =111: Figure out the address from the AX.25 header and context.
  • (LSB) 9-12: M Multicast, DAC Destination Address Compression
    DAM Mode

    • =0000: No compression, not multicast, whole address given
    • =0001: Prefix is link-local prefix, remaining bits are given. Not multicast.
    • =xx10: Not used in 6LoWHAM (we don’t support 16-bit addresses)
    • =0011: Prefix is link-local, figure the rest out from the destination address in the AX.25 header. Not multicast.
    • =0100: Reserved
    • =0101: See the context for the prefix, remaining bits are given. Not multicast.
    • =0111: Figure out the address from the AX.25 header and context. Not multicast.
    • =1000: No compression, multicast address, whole address given
    • =1001: 48-bits of multicast address given, fill in the blanks: ff__::00__:____:____.
    • =1010: 32-bits of multicast address given, fill in the blanks: ff__::00__:____.
    • =1011: 8-bits of multicast address given, fill in the blanks: ff02::00__.
    • =1100: 48-bits RFC-3306/RFC-3956 address, ff__:__LL:PPPP:PPPP:PPPP:PPPP:____:____ where P and L come from the context.
    • =1101: Reserved
    • =1110: Reserved
    • =1111: Reserved

The context ID extension byte has the following format:

  0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7
├───┴───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┤
│      SCI      │      DCI      │
└───────────────┴───────────────┘
  • (MSB) 0-3: Source Context Identifier
  • (LSB) 4-7: Destination Context Identifier

These two sub-fields indicate which specific context is being used to fill in the blanks.

5.2.1: Traffic Class and Flow Label

These may be partially or completely omitted depending on the TF setting in the previous field.

  • TF=00:
      0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
    ├───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┤
    │  ECN  │         DCSP          │ 0   0   0   0 │               │
    ├───────┴───────────────────────┴───────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
    │                          Flow Label                           │
    └───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
    
  • TF=01:
      0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
    ├───┴───┼───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
    │  ECN  │ 0   0 │                                               │
    ├───────┴───────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┬───────────────────────────────┤
    │           Flow Label          │                               │
    ├───────────────────────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
    ╎                   Remainder of IPv6 datagram.                 ╎
    └╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌┘
    
  • TF=10:
      0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
    ├───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
    │  ECN  │         DCSP          │                               │
    ├───────┴───────────────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
    ╎                   Remainder of IPv6 datagram.                 ╎
    └╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌┘
    
  • TF=11: Flow label, ECN and DCSP are set to 0.

5.2.2: Next Header

If 6LP_NHC is not explicitly enabled, the next header byte will appear next.

5.2.3: Hop Limit.

Again, if not explicitly defined in the 6LP_IPHC header, the hop-limit byte will appear next.

5.2.4: Source address

The format here is determined by the values of SAC/SAM:

  • 000: Entire IPv6 address, 16 bytes given here.
  • x01: Last 8-bytes of the address given here
  • For all other values, the source address is omitted.

5.2.5: Destination address

The format here is determined by the values of M/DAC/DAM:

  • x000: Entire IPv6 address, 16 bytes given here.
  • 0x01: Last 8-bytes of the address given here.
  • 1001: 6-bytes of address given here, fill-in-the-blanks.
  • 1010: 4-bytes of address given here, fill-in-the-blanks.
  • 1011: Last byte of address given here, fill-in-the-blank.
  • 1100: 6-bytes of address given here, fill-in-the-blanks.
  • For all other values, the destination address is omitted.

6. 6LoWPAN Next Header

This is used to encode selected IPv6 extensions or L4 protocol headers.

6.1. IPv6 extension headers

A select number of IPv6 extensions may be encoded by replacing the usual “Next Header” byte with the following:

  0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7
├───┴───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┼───┤
│ 1   1   1   0 │    EID    │ N │
└───────────────┴───────────┴───┘

where EID (bits 4-6) is one of:

  • =0 IPv6 Hop-By-Hop options
  • =1 IPv6 Routing
  • =2 IPv6 Fragment
  • =3 IPv6 Destination Options
  • =4 IPv6 Mobility
  • =7 IPv6 Header

and N (bit 7) indicates whether the header’s payload is followed by another 6LowPAN Next Header, or a regular IPv6 Next Header (with its “Next Header” byte). For EID=7, N MUST be 0.

Length fields within the header payload should be counted in bytes instead of 8-byte blocks.

7. Datagram payload

7.1. Non-UDP payloads

For payloads other than UDP packets, these should be inserted into the AX.25 payload as-is following the extensions.

UDP packets with uncompressed headers should also be inserted
in this manner.

7.2. UDP payloads with header compression

For these payloads, the following UDP header should be used:

  0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
├───┴───┴───┴───┴───┼───┼───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
│ 1   1   1   1   0 │ C │   P   │           Source Port         │
├───────────────────┴───┴───────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
╎                                                               ╎
├───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┤
╎                         Destination Port                      ╎
├ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
╎                                                               ╎
├───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┤
│                     Checksum (unless C=1)                     │
└───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
  • (MSB): bits 0-4: Compressed UDP header marker. Literal 11110₂
  • Bit 5: C Compressed UDP checksum
    • 0= UDP checksum is given (recommended value)
    • 1= UDP checksum is omitted
  • Bits 6-7: P Ports
    • 00=Both source and destination addresses are
      given in full

        0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
      ├───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
      │                         Source Port                           │
      ├───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┤
      │                      Destination Port                         │
      └───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘
      
    • 01=Source port is given in full, Least significant 8-bits of destination given, destination port is 0xff00-0xffff (65280-65535)
        0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
      ├───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
      │                         Source Port                           │
      ├───────────────────────────────┬───────────────────────────────┤
      │       Destination Port        │                               │
      ├───────────────────────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
      ╎                    Remainder of UDP packet                    ╎
      └╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌┘
      
    • 10=Destination port is given in full, Least significant 8-bits of source given, source port is 0xff00-0xffff (65280-65535)
        0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
      ├───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
      │          Source Port          │        Destination Port       │
      ├───────────────────────────────┼───────────────────────────────┤
      │    Destination Port (cont.)   │                               │
      ├───────────────────────────────┴ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ─ ┤
      ╎                    Remainder of UDP packet                    ╎
      └╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌╌┘
      
    • 11=Only least significant 4-bits of source and destination ports are given. Port LSB range is 0xf0b0-0xf0bf (61616-61631)
        0   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10  11  12  13  14  15
      ├───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┼───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┴───┤
      │         Source Port           │       Destination Port        │
      └───────────────────────────────┴───────────────────────────────┘
      

The C bit should only be set if the upper-level application asks for it. Whilst 802.15.4 does its own CRC as does AX.25, the field is mandatory in UDP and the recommendation is to only drop it if the application says it’s okay.

Nov 152018
 

Having discussed the idea with a few people, both on the linux-hams mailing list and off-list, I’m starting to formalise a few plans for how this might work.

One option is to augment existing software stacks and inter-operate not just over-the-air, but at an API level.  Brisbane WICEN have a fleet of TNCs all running TheNet X1J, which was a popular Net/ROM software stack for TAPR TNC2-compatible TNCs in the early 90s.  Slowly, these are being replaced with Raspberry Pis equipped with Pi-TNCs and running LinBPQ.

These two inter-operate quite well, and the plan looks to be, to slowly upgrade all the sites to LinBPQ nodes.

Now, 6LoWHAM on TNCs that are nearly as old as I am just isn’t going to fly, but if I can link up to LinBPQ, this alternate protocol can be packaged up and installed along-side LinBPQ in an unobtrusive manner.

There are two things I need to be able to do:

  • Send and receive raw AX.25 frames
  • Read the routing table from LinBPQ

Sending and receiving raw frames

Looking at the interfaces that LinBPQ (and BPQ32) offers, the most promising option looks to be the AGWPE-compatible interface.  The protocol is essentially a TCP link over which the AX.25 frames are encapsulated and sent.

There’s a good description of the protocol here, and looking at the sources for LinBPQ (third link from the bottom of the page), it looks as if the necessary bits of the protocol are present to send and receive raw frames.

In particular, to send raw UI frames, I need to send these as ‘M’ (direct) or ‘V’ frames (via digipeater), and to receive them, I need to make use of the monitoring mode (‘m’ frame).

Reading the routing table

This, is where things will be “fun”.  The AGWPE interface does offer a “heard” frame, which can report on what stations have been heard.  This I think isn’t going to be the holy grail I’m after, although it’ll be a start, maybe.

Alternatively, a way around this might be to “eavesdrop” on the Net/ROM routing frames.  In monitor mode, I should theoretically hear all traffic, including these Net/ROM beacons.  It’s not as nice as being able to simply read LinBPQ’s routing table, but at least I don’t have to generate the Net/ROM messages.

The other way would be to connect to the terminal interface on LinBPQ, and use the NODES command, parsing that.  Ugly, but it’ll get me by.  On that same page is NRR… which looks to be similar in function to TCP/IP’s traceroute.  The feature is also supported by JNOS 2.0, which was released in 2006.  Not old by packet radio standards, but old enough.

Identifying if a remote station supports 6LoWHAM

Now, this is the tricky bit.  Identifying an immediate neighbour is easy enough, you can simply send an ICMPv6 neighbour solicitation message and see if they respond.  In fact, I’m thinking that could be the immediate first step.  There’s no support for service discovery as such, but nodes could advertise an “alias” (just one).

The best bet may be a suck-it-and-see approach.  We should be able to “digipeat” via intermediate nodes as if they were plain L2 AX.25 digipeaters, thus if we have a reason to contact a given node (i.e. there’s unicast traffic queued up to be sent there), we can just try routing an AX.25 frame with a ICMPv6 neighbour solicitation and see if we get a neighbour advertisement.

This carries a risk though: a station may not react well to unknown traffic and may try to parse the message as something it is not.  Thus for unicast, it is not a fail-safe method.

Multicast traffic however will be a challenge, and much of IPv6 relies on multicast.  The Net/ROM station will not know anything about this, as it simply wasn’t a concept back in the day.

For subnets like ff03::1, which on Thread networks usually means “all full-function Thread devices”, this could be sent via non-6LoWHAM digipeaters by broadcasting via that digipeater to the AX.25 station alias “6LHMC” (6LoWHAM Multicast).

This could be used to provide tunnelling of multicast traffic where a route to a station has been discovered via Net/ROM and we need to safely test whether the station can in fact understand 6LoWHAM traffic without the risk of crashing it.

I think the next step might be to look at how a normal IPv6 node would “register” interest in a multicast group so that routers between it and the sender of such a group know where to forward traffic.  IPv6 does have such a mechanism, and I think understanding how multicast traverses subnets is going to be key to making this work.

Oct 272018
 

So earlier, I had mentioned that it’s really not desirable to have ARQ (automatic repeat request) on a link carrying TCP datagrams.  My comment is based on this observation:

http://sites.inka.de/bigred/devel/tcp-tcp.html

In that article, the discussion is about one TCP connection being tunnelled over another TCP connection.  Basically it comes down to the lower layer buffering and re-sending the TCP datagrams just as the upper layer gives up on hearing a reply and re-sends its own attempt.

Now, end-to-end ACKs have been done on long chains of AX.25 networks before.  It’s generally accepted to be an unreliable mechanism.  UDP for sure can benefit, but then many protocols that use UDP already do their own handling of lost messages.  CoAP for instance does its own ARQ, as does TFTP.

Gerald Wagenknecht, Markus Anwander and Torsten Braun discuss some of the impacts of this on a 802.15.4 network in their thesis “Hop-to-Hop Reliability in IP-based Wireless Sensor Networks – a Cross-Layer Approach“.  In this, they talk about a variant of TCP called TSS: TCP Support for Sensor Networks.  This was discussed at depth in a thesis by Adam Dunkels, “Towards TCP/IP for Wireless Sensor Networks“.

This latter document, was apparently the inspiration for 6LoWPAN.  Section 4.4.3 discusses the approaches to handling ARQ in TCP.  Section 9.6 goes into further detail on how ARQ might be handled elsewhere in the network.

Thankfully in our case, it’s only the network that’s constrained, the nodes themselves will be no smaller than a Raspberry Pi which would have held its own against the PC that Adam Dunkels used to write that thesis!

In short, it looks as if just routing IP packets is not going to cut it, we need to actually handle the TCP side of things as well.  As for other protocols like CoAP, I guess the answer is be patient.  The timeout settings defined in RFC-7252 are usually tuneable, and it may be desirable to back those off just a little for use over AX.25.

Oct 202018
 

So, doing some more digging here.  One question people might ask is what kind of applications would I use over this network?

Bear in mind that it’s running at 1200 baud!  If we use HTTP at all, tiny is the word!  No bloated images, and definitely no big heavy JavaScript frameworks like ReactJS, Angular, DoJo or JQuery.  You can forget watching Netflicks in 4k over this link.

HTTP really isn’t designed for low-bandwidth links, as Steve Netting demonstrated:

The page itself is bad enough, but even then, it’s loaded after a minute.  The real slow bit is the 20kB GIF.

So yeah, slow-scan television, the ability to send weather radar images over, that is something I was thinking of, but not like that!

HTTP uses pretty verbose headers:

GET /qld/forecasts/brisbane.shtml?ref=hdr HTTP/1.1
Host: www.bom.gov.au
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:62.0) Gecko/20100101 Firefox/62.0
Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8
Accept-Language: en-AU,en-GB;q=0.8,en-US;q=0.5,en;q=0.3
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
Referer: http://www.bom.gov.au/products/IDR664.loop.shtml
Cookie: bom_meteye_windspeed_units_knots=yes
Connection: keep-alive
Upgrade-Insecure-Requests: 1
Pragma: no-cache
Cache-Control: no-cache

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Accept-Ranges: bytes
Content-Encoding: gzip
Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
Server: Apache
Vary: Accept-Encoding
Content-Length: 6321
Date: Sat, 20 Oct 2018 10:56:12 GMT
Connection: keep-alive

That request is 508 bytes and the response headers are 216 bytes.  It’d be inappropriate on 6LoWPAN as you’d be fragmenting that packet left right and centre in order to squeeze it into the 128-byte 802.15.4 frames.

In that video, ICMP echo requests were also demonstrated, and those weren’t bad!  Yes, a little slow, but workable.  So to me, it’s not the packet network that’s the problem, it’s just that something big like HTTP is just not appropriate for a 1200-baud radio link.

It might work on 9600 baud packet … maybe.  My Kantronics KPC3 doesn’t do 9600 baud over the air.

CoAP was designed for tight messages.  It is UDP based, so your TCP connection overhead disappears, and the “options” are encoded as individual bytes in many cases.  There are other UDP-based protocols that would work fine too, as well as older TCP protocols such as Telnet.

A request, and reply in CoAP look something like this:

Hex dump of request:
00000000  40 01 00 01 3b 65 78 61  6d 70 6c 65 2e 63 6f 6d   @...;exa mple.com
00000010  81 63 03 52 46 77 11 3c                            .c.RFw.< 

Hex dump of response:
    00000000  60 45 00 01 c1 3c ff a1  1a 00 01 11 70 a1 01 a3   `E...<.. ....p...
    00000010  04 18 64 02 6b 31 39 32  2e 31 36 38 2e 30 2e 31   ..d.k192 .168.0.1
    00000020  03 64 65 74 68 30                                  .deth0

Or in more human readable form:

Request:
Constrained Application Protocol, Confirmable, GET, MID:1
    01.. .... = Version: 1
    ..00 .... = Type: Confirmable (0)
    .... 0000 = Token Length: 0
    Code: GET (1)
    Message ID: 1
    Opt Name: #1: Uri-Host: example.com
        Opt Desc: Type 3, Critical, Unsafe
        0011 .... = Opt Delta: 3
        .... 1011 = Opt Length: 11
        Uri-Host: example.com
    Opt Name: #2: Uri-Path: c
        Opt Desc: Type 11, Critical, Unsafe
        1000 .... = Opt Delta: 8
        .... 0001 = Opt Length: 1
        Uri-Path: c
    Opt Name: #3: Uri-Path: RFw
        Opt Desc: Type 11, Critical, Unsafe
        0000 .... = Opt Delta: 0
        .... 0011 = Opt Length: 3
        Uri-Path: RFw
    Opt Name: #4: Content-Format: application/cbor
        Opt Desc: Type 12, Elective, Safe
        0001 .... = Opt Delta: 1
        .... 0001 = Opt Length: 1
        Content-type: application/cbor
    [Uri-Path: coap://example.com/c/RFw]

Response:
Constrained Application Protocol, Acknowledgement, 2.05 Content, MID:1
    01.. .... = Version: 1
    ..10 .... = Type: Acknowledgement (2)
    .... 0000 = Token Length: 0
    Code: 2.05 Content (69)
    Message ID: 1
    Opt Name: #1: Content-Format: application/cbor
        Opt Desc: Type 12, Elective, Safe
        1100 .... = Opt Delta: 12
        .... 0001 = Opt Length: 1
        Content-type: application/cbor
    End of options marker: 255
    Payload: Payload Content-Format: application/cbor, Length: 31
        Payload Desc: application/cbor
        [Payload Length: 31]
Concise Binary Object Representation
    Map: (1 entries)
        Unsigned Integer: 70000
            Map: (1 entries)
                ...0 0001 = Unsigned Integer: 1
                    Map: (3 entries)
                        ...0 0100 = Unsigned Integer: 4
                            Unsigned Integer: 100
                        ...0 0010 = Unsigned Integer: 2
                            Text String: 192.168.0.1
                        ...0 0011 = Unsigned Integer: 3
                            Text String: eth0

That there, also shows another tool to data packing: CBOR.  CBOR is basically binary JSON.  Just like JSON it is schemaless, it has objects, arrays, strings, booleans, nulls and numbers (CBOR differentiates between integers of various sizes and floats).  Unlike JSON, it is tight.  The CBOR blob in this response would look like this as JSON (in the most compact representation possible):

{70000:{4:100,2:"192.168.0.1",3:"eth0"}}

The entire exchange is 190 bytes, less than a quarter of the size of just the HTTP request alone.  I think that would work just fine over 1200 baud packet.  As a bonus, you can also multicast, try doing that with HTTP.

So you’d be writing higher-level services that would use this instead of JSON-REST interfaces.  There’s a growing number of libraries that can consume this sort of thing, and IoT is pushing that further.  I think it’s doable.

Now, on the routing front, I’ve been digging up a bit on Net/ROM.  Net/ROM is actually two parts, Net/ROM Level 3 does the routing and level 4 does the circuit switching.  It’s the “Level 3” bit we want.

Coming up with a definitive specification of the protocol has been a bit tough, it doesn’t help that there is a company called NetROM, but I did manage to find this document.  In a way, if I could make my software behave like a Net/ROM node, I could piggy-back off that to discover neighbours.  Thus this protocol would co-exist along side Net/ROM networks that may be completely oblivious to TCP/IP.

This is preferable to just re-inventing the wheel…yes I know non-circular wheels are so much fun!  Really, once Net/ROM L3 has figured out where everyone is, IP routing just becomes a matter of correctly addressing the AX.25 frame so the next hop receives the message.

VK4RZB at Mt. Coot-tha is one such node running TheNet.  Easy enough to do tests on as it’s a mere stone throw away from my home QTH.

There’s a little consideration to make about how to label the AX.25 frame.  Obviously, it’ll be a UI frame, but what PID field should I use?  My instinct suggests that I should just label it as “ARPA Internet Protocol”, since it is Internet Protocol traffic, just IPv6 instead of v4.  Not all the codes are taken though, 0xc9 is free, so I could be cheeky and use that instead.  If the idea takes off, we can talk with the TAPR then.

Oct 102018
 

This is another brain dump of ideas.

So, part of me wants to consider the idea of using amateur radio as a transmission mechanism for 6LoWPAN.  The idea being that we use NET/ROM and AX.25 or similar schemes as a transport mechanism for delivering shortened IPv6 packets.  Over this, we can use standard TCP/IP programming to write applications.

Protocols designed for low-bandwidth constrained networks are ideal here, so things like CoAP where emphasis is placed on compact representation.  6LoWPAN normally runs over IEEE 802.15.4 which has a payload limit of 128 bytes.  AX.25 has a limit of 256 bytes, so is already doing better.

The thinking is that I “encode” the call-sign into a “hardware” address.  MAC addresses are nominally 48-bits, although the IEEE is trying to phase that out in favour of 64-bit EUIs.  Officially the IEEE looks after this, so we want to avoid doing things that might clash with their system.

A EUI-48 (MAC) address is 6-bytes long, where the first 3 bytes identify the type of address and the organisation, and the latter 3 bytes identify an individual device.  The least significant two bits of the first byte are flags that decide whether the address is unicast or local, and whether it is globally administered (by the IEEE) or locally administered.

To avoid complications, we should probably keep the unicast bit cleared to indicate that these addresses are unicast addresses.

Some might argue that the ITU assigns prefixes to countries, and these countries have national bodies that hand out callsigns, thus we could consider callsigns as “globally administered”.  Truth is, the IEEE has nothing to do with the process, and could very legitimately assign the EUI-48 prefix 56-4b-34 to a company… in that hypothetical scenario, there goes all the addresses that might represent amateur operators stationed in Queensland.  So let’s call these “locally administered”, since there are suffixes the user may choose (e.g. “/P”).

That gives us 46-bits to play with.  7-bit ASCII just fits 6 characters, which would just fit the callsigns used in AX.25 with enough room for a 4-bit SSID.  We don’t need all 128 characters though, and a scheme based on DEC’s Radix50 can pack in far more.

We can get 8 arbitrary Radix50 characters into 43 bits, which gives us 3 left over which can be used as the user wishes.  We’ll probably call it the SSID, but unlike AX.25, will be limited from 0-7.  The user can always use the least significant character in their callsign field for an additional 6 bits, which gives them 9 bits to play with.  (i.e. “VK4MSL-1″#0 to encode the AX.25 SSID “VK4MSL-10”)

Flip the multicast bit, and we’ve got a group address.

SLAAC derives the IPv6 address from the EUI-48, so the IPv6 address will effectively encode the callsigns of the two communicating stations.  If both are on the same “mesh”, then we can probably borrow ideas from 6LoWPAN for shortening that address.

Oct 032018
 

So, I’ll admit to looking at AX.25 with the typical modems available (the classical 1200-baud AFSK and the more modern G3RUH modem which runs at a blistering 9600 baud… look out 5G!) years ago and wondering “what’s the point”?

It was Brisbane Area WICEN’s involvement in the International Rally of Queensland that changed my view somewhat.  This was an event that, until CAMS knocked it on the head, ran annually in the Imbil State Forest up in the Sunshine Coast hinterland.

There, WICEN used it for forwarding the scores of drivers as they passed through each stage of the rally.  A checkpoint would be at the start and finish of each stage, and a packet network would be set up with digipeaters in strategic locations and a base station, often located at the Imbil school.

The organisers of IRoQ did experiment with other ways of getting scores through, including hiring bandwidth on satellites, flying planes around in circles over the area, and other shenanigans.  Although these systems had faster throughput speeds, one thing they had which we did not have, was latency.  The score would arrive back at base long before the car had left the check point.

This freed up the analogue FM network for reporting other more serious matters.

In addition to this kind of work, WICEN also help out with horse endurance rides.  Traditionally we’ve just relied on good ol’e analogue FM radio, but in events such as the Tom Quilty, there has been a desire to use packet as a mechanism for reporting when horses arrive at given checkpoints and to perhaps enable autonomous stations that can detect horses via RFID and report those “back to base” to deter riders from cheating.

The challenge of AX.25 is two-fold:

  1. With the exception of Linux, no other OS has any kind of baked-in support for it, so writing applications that can interact with it means either implementing your own AX.25 stack or interfacing to some third-party stack such as BPQ.
  2. Due to the specialised stack, applications often have to run as privileged applications, can have problems with firewalling, etc.

The AX.25 protocol does do static routing.  It offers connected-mode links (like TCP) and a connectionless-mode (like UDP), and there are at least two routing protocols I know of that allow for dynamic routing (ROSE, Net/ROM).  There is a standard for doing IPv4 over AX.25, but you still need to manage the allocation of addresses and other details, it isn’t plug-and-play.

Net/ROM would make an ideal way to forward 6LoWPAN traffic, except it only does connected mode, and doing IP over a “TCP-like” link is really a bad idea.  (Anything that does automatic repeat requests really messes with TCP/IP.)

I have no idea whether ROSE does the connectionless mode, but the idea of needing to come up with a 10-digit numeric “address” is a real turn-off.

If the address used can be derived off the call-sign of the operator, that makes life a lot easier.

The IPv6 address format has enough bits to do that.  To me the most obvious way would be to derive a MAC address from a call-sign and an arbitrarily chosen digit (0-7).  It would be reversible of course, and since the MAC address is used in SLAAC, you would see the station’s call-sign in the IPv6 address.

The thinking is that there’s a lot of problems that have been solved in 6LoWPAN.  Discovery of services for example is handled using mechanisms like mDNS and CoRE RD.  We don’t need to forward Internet traffic, although being able to pull up the Mt. Kanigan and Mt. Stapylton radars over such a network would be real handy at times (yes, I know it’ll be slow).

The OS will view the packet network like a VPN, and so writing applications that can talk over packet will be no different to writing any other kind of network software.  Any consumer desktop OS written in the last 16 years has the necessary infrastructure to support it (even Windows 2000, there was a downloadable add-on for it).

Linking two separate “mesh” networks via point-to-point links is also trivial.  Each mesh will of course see the other as “external” but participants on both can nonetheless communicate.

The guts of 6LoWPAN is in RFC-4944.  This specifies details about how the IPv6 datagram is encoded as a IEEE 802.15.4 payload, and how the infrastructure within 802.15.4 is used to route IPv6.  Gnarly details like how fragmentation of a 1280-byte IPv6 datagram into something that will fit the 128-byte maximum 802.15.4 frames is handled here.  For what it’s worth, AX.25 allows 255 bytes (or was it 256?), so we’re ahead there.

Crucially, it is assumed that the 802.15.4 layer can figure out how to get from node A to node Z via B… C…, etc.  802.15.4 networks are managed by a PAN coordinator, which provides various services to the network.

AX.25 makes this “our problem”.  Yes the sender of a frame can direct which digipeaters a frame should be passed to, but they have to figure that out.  It’s like sending an email by UUCP, you need a map of the Internet to figure out what someone’s address is relative to your site.

Plain AX.25 digipeaters will of course be part of the mix, so having the ability for a node stuck on one side of such a digipeater would be worth having, but ultimately, the aim here will be to provide a route discovery mechanism in place that, knowing a few static digipeater routes, can figure out who is able to hear whom, and route traffic accordingly.

May 192018
 

Recently, a new project sprang up on the Hackaday.io site; it was for the KiteBoard, an open-source cellular development platform.  In a nutshell, this is a single-board-computer that embeds a full mobile system-on-chip and runs the Android operating system.  The project is seeking crowd funding for the second version of this platform.

With it, you can build smartphones (of course), tablets, tele-presence robots, or really, any project which can benefit from a beefy CPU with a built-in cellular modem.  It comes as a kit, which you then assemble yourself.  The level of difficulty in assembly is no greater than that of assembling a desktop PC: the circuit boards are pre-populated, you just need to connect them together.  In this version, some soldering of pushbuttons and wires is needed: all through-hole components.  No reflow ovens or solder paste is necessary here, an 8-year-old could do it.

The break-out board for the CPU card features in addition to connections for all the usual cellular phone signals (e.g. earpiece, microphone, button inputs) a GPIO header that follows the de-facto standard “Raspberry Pi” interface, allowing many Raspberry Pi “hats” to plug directly into this board.

That lends itself greatly to expandability.  Want a eInk or OLED notification display on the back?  A scrolling LED display?  A piano?  A games console?  Knock yourself out!  You, are the designer, you decide.  There are lots of options.

I for one, would consider an amateur radio transceiver, an external antenna socket and a beefier battery.  Presently, I get around with the ZTE T83 (“Telstra Dave”), which works okay, but as it runs an old version of Android (4.1), running newer applications on it is a problem.  I believe it could run something newer, but ZTE believe that their job was finished in 2013 when the first one rolled off the production line.

The box did not include a copy of the kernel sources or any link to where that could be obtained.  (GNU GPL v2 section 2b?  What’s that?)

The successor, the T84 is a little better, in fact it has pretty much the same hardware that’s in Kite, but it struggles in rural areas.  On a recent trip into the Snowy Mountains, my phone would be working fine, when my father’s T84 would report “no service available”.  Clearly, someone at Telstra/ZTE screwed up the firmware on it, and so it fails to switch networks correctly.  Without the sources, we are unable to fix that.  Even something as simple as replacing a battery is neigh on impossible, they’re built like bombs: not designed to be taken apart.

I have no desire to spend money on a company that puts out poorly supported rubbish running pirated operating system kernels.  The story is similar elsewhere, and most devices while better in specs and operating system, lack the external antenna connection that I desire in a phone.

Kite represents a breath of fresh air in that regard.  It is to smart phones, what the Raspberry Pi is to single board computers in general.  It’s not only designed to be taken apart, it’s shipped to you as parts.  Apparently with Kite v2, there’ll be schematics available, so you’ll be able to look-up the datasheets of respective components and be able to make informed decisions about part substitutions.  All antenna connections are socketed, so you can substitute at will.

While the OS isn’t going to be as open as one might like (mobile chipset manufacturers like their black boxes), it’s a BIG step in the right direction.  There’s more scope for supporting this platform long-term, than contemporary ones.

As far as actually using Kite, Shree Kumar was generous enough to organise the loan of a Kite for me to test with the Australian networks.  The phone takes up to two micro-SIMs (about 15mm×12mm); one on the daughter card (this is SIM 1) and one on the CPU card (SIM 2).

For the sake of testing, I figured I’d try it out with the two major networks, Telstra and Optus.  As it happens, my Telstra SIM is too big (they call it a “full-size” SIM now; I remember full-size SIMs being credit-card sized), so rather than chopping up my existing SIM or getting it transferred, I bought and activated a prepaid service.  I also bought a SIM for Optus.  I bought $10 credit for each.

As it happens, the Optus one came with data, the Telstra did not.  No big deal in this case.  The phone does have a limitation in that it will talk to one 3G/4G network and one GSM (2G) network at a time.  Given both networks I chose have abandoned 2G, that pretty much means the dual-SIM functionality on this model is severely hobbled.  That said, either SIM can operate in 3G mode, and so it’s simple enough to switch one SIM into 2G mode then activate the other in 3G/4G mode.  So far, the Kite has spent most of its time on Optus.

Evidently Vodaphone still have a 2G network… at least the Kite does see one 2G cell operated by them.  Long term, this is a problem that all dual-SIM phone chipset makers will have to deal with, a future Kite may well be able to do 3G simultaneously on both SIMs, but for me, this is not a show-stopper.

I’ve put together this review of the Kite.  It’s rare for me to be in front of a camera instead of behind it, and yes, the editing is very rough.  If there is time (there won’t be this weekend) I hope to take the phone out to a rural area and try it out with the more distant networks, but so far it seems happy enough to switch to 3G when I get home, and use 4G when I’m at work, so this I see as a promising sign.

The KickStarter is lagging behind quite a way in the funding goal, but alternate options are being considered for getting this project off-the-ground.  Here’s hoping that the project does get up, and that we get to see Kite v2 being developed and made for real, as I think the mobile phone industry really does need a viable open competitor.

Oct 102017
 

So, over the last few years, computing power has gotten us to the point where remotely operated aerial vehicles are not only a thing, but are cheap and widely available.

There are of course, lots of good points about these toys, lots of tasks in which they can be useful.  No, I don’t think Amazon Prime is one of them.

They come with their risks though, and there’s a big list of do’s and don’ts regarding their use.  For recreational use, CASA for example, have this list of rules.  This includes amongst other things, staying below 120m altitude, and 30m away from any person.

For a building, that might as well be 30m from the top of the roof, as you cannot tell if there are people within that building, or where in that building those people reside, or from what entrance they may exit.

I in principle have no problem with people playing around with them.  I draw the line where such vehicles enter a person’s property.

The laws are rather lax about what is considered trespass with regards to such vehicles.  The no-brainer is if the vehicle enters any building or lands (controlled or otherwise) on any surface within the property.  A big reason for this is that the legal system often trails technological advancement.

This does not mean it is valid to fly over someone’s property.  For one thing, you had better ensure there is absolutely no chance that your device might malfunction and cause damage or injury to any person or possession on that property.

Moreover, without speaking to the owner of said property, you make it impossible for that person to take any kind of preventative action that might reduce the risk of malfunction, or alert you to any risks posed on the property.

In my case, I operate an amateur radio station.  My transmitting equipment is capable of 100W transmit power between 1.8MHz and 54MHz, 50W transmit power between 144MHz and 148MHz, and 20W transmit power between 420MHz and 450MHz, using FM, SSB, AM and CW, and digital modes built on these analogue modulation schemes.

Most of my antennas are dipoles, so 2.2dBi, I do have some higher-gain whips, and of course, may choose to use yagis or even dish antennas.  The stations that I might choose to work are mostly terrestrial in nature, however, airborne stations such as satellites, or indeed bouncing off objects such as the Moon, are also possibilities.

Beyond the paperwork that was submitted when applying for my radio license (which for this callsign, was filed about 9 years ago now, or for my original callsign was filed back in December 2007), there is no paperwork required to be submitted or filled out prior to me commencing transmissions.  Not to the ACMA, not to CASA, not to registered drone operators in the local area, not anybody.

While I’ve successfully operated this station with no complaints from my neighbours for nearly 10 years… it is worth pointing out that the said neighbours are a good distance away from my transmitting equipment.  Far enough away that the electromagnetic fields generated are sufficiently diminished to pose no danger to themselves or their property.

Any drone that enters the property, is at risk of malfunction if it strays too close to transmitting antennas.  If you think I will cease activity because you are in the area, think again.  There is no expectation on my part that I should alter my activities due to the presence of a drone.  It is highly probable that, whilst being inside, I am completely unaware of your device’s presence.  I cannot, and will not, take responsibility for your device’s electromagnetic immunity, or lack thereof.

In the event that it does malfunction though… it will be deemed to have trespassed if it falls within the property, and may be confiscated.  If it causes damage to any person or possession within the property, it will be confiscated, and the owner will be expected to pay damages prior to the device’s return.

In short, until such time as the laws are clarified on the matter, I implore all operators of these devices, to not fly over any property without the express permission of the owner of that property.  At least then, we can all be on the same page, we can avoid problems, and make the operation safer for all.

Mar 262017
 

Yesterday’s post was rather long, but was intended for mostly technical audiences outside of amateur radio.  This post serves as a brain dump of volatile memory before I go to sleep for the night.  (Human conscious memory is more like D-RAM than one might realise.)

Radio interface

So, many in our group use packet radio TNCs already, with a good number using the venerable Kantronics KPC3.  These have a DB9 port that connects to the radio and a second DB25 RS-323 port that connects to the computer.

My proposal: we make an audio interface that either plugs into that DB9 port and re-uses the interface cables we already have, or directly into the radio’s data port.

This should connect to an audio interface on the computer.

For EMI’s sake, I’d recommend a USB sound dongle like this, or these, or this as that audio interface.  I looked on Jaycar and did see this one, which would also work (and burn a hole in your wallet!).

If you walk in and the asking price is more than $30, I’d seriously consider these other options.  Of those options, U-Mart are here in Brisbane; go to their site, order a dongle then tell the site you’ll come and pick it up.  They’ll send you an email with an order number when it’s ready, you just need to roll up to the store, punch that number into a terminal in the shop, then they’ll call your name out for you to collect and pay for it.

Scorptec are in Melbourne, so you’ll have to have items shipped, but are also worth talking to.  (They helped me source some bits for my server cluster when U-Mart wouldn’t.)

USB works over two copper pairs; one delivers +5V and 0V, the other is a differential pair for data.  In short, the USB link should be pretty immune from EMI issues.

At worst, you should be able to deal with it with judicious application of ferrite beads to knock down the common mode current and using a combination of low-ESR electrolytic and ceramic capacitors across the power rails.

If you then keep the analogue cables as short as absolutely possible, you should have little opportunity for RF to get in.

I don’t recommend the TigerTronics Signalink interfaces, they use cheap and nasty isolation transformers that lead to serious performance issues.

Receive audio

For the receive audio, we feed the audio from the radio and we feed that via potentiometer to a 3.5mm TRS (“phono”) plug tip, with sleeve going to common.  This plugs into the Line-In or Microphone input on the sound device.

Push to Talk and Transmit audio

I’ve bundled these together for a good reason.  The conventional way for computers to drive PTT is via an RS-232 serial port.

We can do that, but we won’t unless we have to.

Unless you’re running an original SoundBLASTER card, your audio interface is likely stereo.  We can get PTT control via an envelope detector forming a minimal-latency VOX control.

Another 3.5mm TRS plug connects to the “headphone” or “line-out” jack on our sound device and breaks out the left and right channels.

The left and right channels from the sound device should be fed into the “throw” contacts on two single-pole double-throw toggle switches.

The select pin (mechanically operated by the toggle handle) on each switch thus is used to select the left or right channel.

One switch’s select pin feeds into a potentiometer, then to the radio’s input.  We will call that the “modulator” switch; it selects which channel “modulates” our audio.  We can again adjust the gain with the potentiometer.

The other switch first feeds through a small Schottky diode then across a small electrolytic capacitor (to 0V) then through a small resistor before finally into the base of a small NPN signal transistor (e.g. BC547).  The emitter goes to 0V, the collector is our PTT signal.

This is the envelope detector we all know and love from our old experiments with crystal sets.  In theory, we could hook a speaker to the collector up to a power source and listen to AM radio stations, but in this case, we’ll be sending a tone down this channel to turn the transistor, and thus or PTT, on.

The switch feeding this arrangement we’ll call the “PTT” switch.

By using this arrangement, we can use either audio channel for modulation or PTT control, or we can use one channel for both.  1200-baud AFSK, FreeDV, etc, should work fine with both on the one channel.

If we just want to pass through analogue audio, then we probably want modulation separate, so we can hold the PTT open during speech breaks without having an annoying tone superimposed on our signal.

It may be prudent to feed a second resistor into the base of that NPN, running off to the RTS pin on an RS-232 interface.  This will let us use software that relies on RS-232 PTT control, which can be added by way of a USB-RS232 dongle.

The cheap Prolific PL-2303 ones sold by a few places (including Jaycar) will work for this.  (If your software expects a 16550 UART interface on port 0x3f8 or similar, consider running it in a virtual machine.)

Ideally though, this should not be needed, and if added, can be left disconnected without harm.

Software

There are a few “off-the-shelf” packages that should work fine with this arrangement.

AX.25 software

AGWPE on Windows provides a software TNC.  On Linux, there’s soundmodem (which I have used, and presently mirror) and Direwolf.

Shouldn’t need a separate PTT channel, it should be sufficient to make the pre-amble long enough to engage PTT and rely on the envelope detector recognising the packet.

Digital Voice

FreeDV provides an open-source digital voice platform system for Windows, Linux and MacOS X.

This tool also lets us send analogue voice.  Digital voice should be fine, the first frame might get lost but as a frame is 40ms, we just wait before we start talking, like we would for regular analogue radio.

For the analogue side of things, we would want tone-driven PTT.  Not sure if that’s supported, but hey, we’ve got the source code, and yours truly has worked with it, it shouldn’t be hard to add.

Slow-scan television

The two to watch here would be QSSTV (Linux) and EasyPal (Windows).  QSSTV is open-source, so if we need to make modifications, we can.

Not sure who maintains EasyPal these days, not Eric VK4AES as he’s no longer with us (RIP and thank-you).  Here, we might need an RS-232 PTT interface, which as discussed, is not a hard modification.

Radioteletype

Most is covered by FLDigi.  Modes with a fairly consistent duty cycle will work fine with the VOX PTT, and once again, we have the source, we can make others work.

Custom software ideas

So we can use a few off-the-shelf packages to do basic comms.

  • We need auditability of our messaging system.  Analogue FM, we can just use a VOX-like function on the computer to record individual received messages, and to record outgoing traffic.  Text messages and files can be logged.
  • Ideally, we should have some digital signing of logs to make them tamper-resistant.  Then we can mathematically prove what was sent.
  • In a true  emergency, it may be necessary to encrypt what we transmit.  This is fine, we’re allowed to do this in such cases, and we can always turn over our audited logs for authorities anyway.
  • Files will be sent as blocks which are forward-error corrected (or forward-erasure coded).  We can use a block cipher such as AES-256 to encrypt these blocks before FEC.  OpenPGP would work well here rather doing it from scratch; just send the OpenPGP output using FEC blocks.  It should be possible to pick out symmetric key used at the receiving end for auditing, this would be done if asked for by Government.  DIY not necessary, the building blocks are there.
  • Digital voice is a stream, we can use block ciphers but this introduces latency and there’s always the issue of bit errors.  Stream ciphers on the other hand, work by generating a key stream, then XOR-ing that with the data.  So long as we can keep sync in the face of bit errors, use of a stream cipher should not impair noise immunity.
  • Signal fade is a worse problem, I suggest a cleartext (3-bit, 4-bit?) gray-code sync field for synchronisation.  Receiver can time the length of a fade, estimate the number of lost frames, then use the field to re-sync.
  • There’s more than a dozen stream ciphers to choose from.  Some promising ones are ACHTERBAHN-128, Grain 128a, HC-256, Phelix, Py, the Salsa20 family, SNOW 2/3G, SOBER-128, Scream, Turing, MUGI, Panama, ISAAC and Pike.
  • Most (all?) stream ciphers are symmetric.  We would have to negotiate/distribute a key somehow, either use Diffie-Hellman or send a generated key as an encrypted file transfer (see above).  The key and both encrypted + decrypted streams could be made available to Government if needed.
  • The software should be capable of:
    • Real-time digital voice (encrypted and clear; the latter being compatible with FreeDV)
    • File transfer (again, clear and encrypted using OpenPGP, and using good FEC, files will be cryptographically signed by sender)
    • Voice mail and SSTV, implemented using file transfer.
    • Radioteletype modes (perhaps PSK31, Olivia, etc), with logs made.
    • Analogue voice pass-through, with recordings made.
    • All messages logged and time-stamped, received messages/files hashed, hashes cryptographically signed (OpenPGP signature)
    • Operation over packet networks (AX.25, TCP/IP)
    • Standard message forms with some basic input validation.
    • Ad-hoc routing between interfaces (e.g. SSB to AX.25, AX.25 to TCP/IP, etc) should be possible.
  • The above stack should ideally work on low-cost single-board computers that are readily available and are low-power.  Linux support will be highest priority, Windows/MacOS X/BSD is a nice-to-have.
  • GNU Radio has building blocks that should let us do most of the above.