Apr 112021
 

So, for the past 12 months we’ve basically had a whirlwind of different “solutions” to the problem of contact tracing. The common theme amongst them seems to be they’re all technical-based, and they all assume people carry a smartphone, registered with one of the two major app stores, and made in the last few years.

Quite simply, if you’re carrying an old 3G brick from 2010, you don’t exist to these “apps”. Our own federal government tried its hand in this space by taking OpenTrace (developed by the Singapore Government and released as GPLv3 open-source) and rebadging that (and re-licensing it!) as COVIDSafe.

This had very mild success to say the least, with contact tracers telling us that this fancy “app” wasn’t telling them anything new. So much focus has been put on signing into and out of venues.

To be honest, I’m fine with this until such time as we get this gift from China under control. The concept is not what irks me, it’s its implementation.

At first, it was done on paper. Good old fashioned pen and paper. Simple, nearly foolproof, didn’t crash, didn’t need credit, didn’t need recharging, didn’t need network coverage… except for two problems:

  1. people who can’t successfully operate a pen (Hmm, what went wrong, Education Queensland?)
  2. people who can’t take the process seriously (and an app solves this how?)

So they demanded that all venues use an electronic system. Fine, so we had a myriad of different electronic web-based systems, a little messy, but it worked, and for the most part, the venue’s system didn’t care what your phone was.

A couple, even could take check-in by SMS. Still rocking a Nokia 3210 from 1998? Assuming you’ve found a 2G cell tower in range, you can still check in. Anything that can do at least 3G will be fine.

An advantage of this solution is that they have your correct mobile phone number then and it’s a simple matter for Queensland Health to talk to Telstra/Optus/Vodaphone/whoever to get your name and address from that… as a bonus, the cell sites may even have logs of your device’s IMEI roaming, so there’s more for the contact tracing kitty.

I only struck one venue out of dozens, whose system would not talk to my phone. Basically some JavaScript library didn’t load, and so it fell in a heap.

Until yesterday.

The Queensland Government has decided to foist its latest effort on everybody, the “Check-in Queensland” app. It is available on Google Play Store and Apple App Store, and their QR codes are useless without it. I can’t speak about the Apple version of the software, but for the Android one, it requires Android 5.0 or above.

Got an old reliable clunker that you keep using because it pulls the weakest signals and has a stand-by time that can be measured in days? Too bad. For me, my Android 4.1 device is not welcome. There are people out there for whom, even that, is a modern device.

Why not buy a newer phone? Well, when I bought this particular phone, back in 2015… I was looking for 3 key features:

  1. Make and receive (voice) telephone calls
  2. Send and receive short text messages
  3. Provide a Internet link for my laptop via USB/WiFi

Anything else is a bonus. It has a passable camera. It can (and does) play music. There’s a functional web browser (Firefox). There’s a selection of software I can download (via F-Droid). It Does What I Need It To Do. The battery still lasts 2-3 days between charges on stand-by. I’ve seen it outperform nearly every contemporary device on the market in areas with weak mobile coverage, and I can connect an external antenna to boost that if needed.

About the only thing I could wish for is open-source firmware and a replaceable battery. (Well, it sort-of is replaceable. Just a lot of frigging around to get at it. I managed to replace a GPS battery, so this should be doable.)

So, given this new check-in requirement, what is someone like me to do? Whilst the Queensland Government is urging people to install their application, they recognise that there are those of us who cannot because we lack anything that will run it. So they ask that venues have a device on hand that can be used to check visitors in if this situation arises.

My little “hack” simply exploits this:

# This file is part of pylabels, a Python library to create PDFs for printing
# labels.
# Copyright (C) 2012, 2013, 2014 Blair Bonnett
#
# pylabels is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the
# terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software
# Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later
# version.
#
# pylabels is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY
# WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR
# A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with
# pylabels.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.

import argparse
import labels
import time
from reportlab.lib.units import mm
from reportlab.graphics import shapes
from reportlab.lib import colors
from reportlab.graphics.barcode import qr

rows = 4
cols = 2
# Specifications for Avery C32028 2×4 85×54mm
specs = labels.Specification(210, 297, cols, rows, 85, 54, corner_radius=0,
        left_margin=17, right_margin=17, top_margin=31, bottom_margin=32)

def draw_label(label, width, height, checkin_id):
    label.add(shapes.String(
        42.5*mm, 50*mm,
        'COVID-19 Check-in Card',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=12, textAnchor='middle'
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        42.5*mm, 46*mm,
        'The Queensland Government has chosen to make the',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=8, textAnchor='middle'
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        42.5*mm, 43*mm,
        'CheckIn QLD application incompatible with my device.',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=8, textAnchor='middle'
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        42.5*mm, 40*mm,
        'Please enter my contact details into your system',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=8, textAnchor='middle'
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        42.5*mm, 37*mm,
        'at your convenience.',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=8, textAnchor='middle'
    ))

    label.add(shapes.String(
        5*mm, 32*mm,
        'Name: Joe Citizen',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=12
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        5*mm, 28*mm,
        'Phone: 0432 109 876',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=12
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        5*mm, 24*mm,
        'Email address:',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=12
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        84*mm, 20*mm,
        'myaddress+c%o@example.com' % checkin_id,
        fontName="Courier", fontSize=12, textAnchor='end'
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        5*mm, 16*mm,
        'Home address:',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=12
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        15*mm, 12*mm,
        '12 SomeDusty Rd',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=12
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        15*mm, 8*mm,
        'BORING SUBURB, QLD, 4321',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=12
    ))

    label.add(shapes.String(
        2, 2, 'Date: ',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=10
    ))
    label.add(shapes.Rect(
        10*mm, 2, 12*mm, 4*mm,
        fillColor=colors.white, strokeColor=colors.gray
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        22.5*mm, 2, '-', fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=10
    ))
    label.add(shapes.Rect(
        24*mm, 2, 6*mm, 4*mm,
        fillColor=colors.white, strokeColor=colors.gray
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        30.5*mm, 2, '-', fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=10
    ))
    label.add(shapes.Rect(
        32*mm, 2, 6*mm, 4*mm,
        fillColor=colors.white, strokeColor=colors.gray
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        40*mm, 2, 'Time: ',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=10
    ))
    label.add(shapes.Rect(
        50*mm, 2, 6*mm, 4*mm,
        fillColor=colors.white, strokeColor=colors.gray
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        56.5*mm, 2, ':', fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=10
    ))
    label.add(shapes.Rect(
        58*mm, 2, 6*mm, 4*mm,
        fillColor=colors.white, strokeColor=colors.gray
    ))

    label.add(shapes.String(
        10*mm, 5*mm, 'Year',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=6, fillColor=colors.gray
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        24*mm, 5*mm, 'Month',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=6, fillColor=colors.gray
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        32*mm, 5*mm, 'Day',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=6, fillColor=colors.gray
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        50*mm, 5*mm, 'Hour',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=6, fillColor=colors.gray
    ))
    label.add(shapes.String(
        58*mm, 5*mm, 'Minute',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=6, fillColor=colors.gray
    ))

    label.add(qr.QrCodeWidget(
            '%o' % checkin_id,
            barHeight=12*mm, barWidth=12*mm, barBorder=1,
            x=73*mm, y=0
    ))

# Grab the arguments
OCTAL_T = lambda x : int(x, 8)
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument(
        '--base', type=OCTAL_T,
        default=(int(time.time() / 86400.0) << 8)
)
parser.add_argument('--offset', type=OCTAL_T, default=0)
parser.add_argument('pages', type=int, default=1)
args = parser.parse_args()

# Figure out cards per sheet (max of 256 cards per day)
cards = min(rows * cols * args.pages, 256)

# Figure out check-in IDs
start_id = args.base + args.offset
end_id = start_id + cards
print ('Generating cards from %o to %o' % (start_id, end_id))

# Create the sheet.
sheet = labels.Sheet(specs, draw_label, border=True)

sheet.add_labels(range(start_id, end_id))

# Save the file and we are done.
sheet.save('checkin-cards.pdf')
print("{0:d} cards(s) output on {1:d} page(s).".format(sheet.label_count, sheet.page_count))

That script (which may look familiar), generates up to 256 check-in cards. The check-in cards are business card sized and look like this:

That card has:

  1. the person’s full name
  2. a contact telephone number
  3. an email address with a unique sub-address component for verification purposes (compatible with services that use + for sub-addressing like Gmail)
  4. home address
  5. date and time of check-in (using ISO-8601 date format)
  6. a QR code containing a “check-in number” (which also appears in the email sub-address)

Each card has a unique check-in number (seen above in the email address and as the content of the QR code) which is derived from the number of days since 1st January 1970 and a 8-bit sequence number; so we can generate up to 256 cards a day. The number is just meant to be unique to the person generating them, two people using this script can, and likely will, generate cards with the same check-in ID.

I actually added the QR code after I printed off a batch (thought of the idea too late). Maybe the next batch will have the QR code. This can be used with a phone app of your choosing (e.g. maybe use BarcodeScanner to copy the check-in number to the clip-board then paste it into a spreadsheet, or make your own tool) to add other data. In my case, I’ll use a paper system:

The script that generates those is here:

# This file is part of pylabels, a Python library to create PDFs for printing
# labels.
# Copyright (C) 2012, 2013, 2014 Blair Bonnett
#
# pylabels is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the
# terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the Free Software
# Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or (at your option) any later
# version.
#
# pylabels is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY
# WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR
# A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU General Public License for more details.
#
# You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along with
# pylabels.  If not, see <http://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.

import argparse
import labels
import time
from reportlab.lib.units import mm
from reportlab.graphics import shapes
from reportlab.lib import colors

rows = 4
cols = 2
# Specifications for Avery C32028 2×4 85×54mm
specs = labels.Specification(210, 297, cols, rows, 85, 54, corner_radius=0,
        left_margin=17, right_margin=17, top_margin=31, bottom_margin=32)

def draw_label(label, width, height, checkin_id):
    label.add(shapes.String(
        42.5*mm, 50*mm,
        'COVID-19 Check-in Log',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=12, textAnchor='middle'
    ))

    label.add(shapes.Rect(
        1*mm, 3*mm, 20*mm, 45*mm,
        fillColor=colors.lightgrey,
        strokeColor=None
    ))
    label.add(shapes.Rect(
        41*mm, 3*mm, 28*mm, 45*mm,
        fillColor=colors.lightgrey,
        strokeColor=None
    ))

    for row in range(3, 49, 5):
        label.add(shapes.Line(1*mm, row*mm, 84*mm, row*mm, strokeWidth=0.5))
    for col in (1, 21, 41, 69, 84):
        label.add(shapes.Line(col*mm, 48*mm, col*mm, 3*mm, strokeWidth=0.5))

    label.add(shapes.String(
        2*mm, 44*mm,
        'In',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=8
    ))

    label.add(shapes.String(
        22*mm, 44*mm,
        'Check-In #',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=8
    ))

    label.add(shapes.String(
        42*mm, 44*mm,
        'Place',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=8
    ))

    label.add(shapes.String(
        83*mm, 44*mm,
        'Out',
        fontName="Helvetica", fontSize=8, textAnchor='end'
    ))

# Grab the arguments
parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument('pages', type=int, default=1)
args = parser.parse_args()

cards = rows * cols * args.pages

# Create the sheet.
sheet = labels.Sheet(specs, draw_label, border=True)

sheet.add_labels(range(cards))

# Save the file and we are done.
sheet.save('checkin-log-cards.pdf')
print("{0:d} cards(s) output on {1:d} page(s).".format(sheet.label_count, sheet.page_count))

When I see one of these Check-in Queensland QR codes, I simply pull out the log card, a blank check-in card, and a pen. I write the check-in number from the blank card (visible in the email address) in my log with the date/time, place, and on the blank card, write the same date/time and hand that to the person collecting the details.

They can write that into their device at their leisure, and it saves time not having to spell it all out. As for me, I just have to remember to write the exit time. If Queensland Health come a ringing, I have a record of where I’ve been on hand… or if I receive an email, I can use the check-in number to validate that this is legitimate, or even tell if a venue has on-sold my personal details to an advertiser.

I guess it’d be nice if the Queensland Government could at least add a form to their fancy pages that their flashy QR codes send people to, so that those who do not have the application can still at least check-in without it, but that’d be too much to ask.

In the meantime, this at least meets them half-way, and hopefully does so which ensures minimal contact and increases efficiency.

Dec 012020
 

The last few years have been a testing time for world politics. Recent events have seen much sabre-rattling, but really, none of this has suddenly “appeared”… it’s been slowly bubbling away for some time now.

Economic tunnel-vision

For a long time now, much of our world has revolved around the unit of currency. Call it the US dollar, the Australian dollar, the British Pound, Chinese Yuan, whatever… for the past 50 years or so, we have been “seduced” by two concepts which developed in the latter part of last century:

  • economies of scale
  • just-in-time production

The concepts are on the surface, fairly simple.

Just-in-time production forgoes having a large stock and inventory of components to feed your supply-lines in favour of ordering just enough of what you need to fulfil the orders you have active at the present moment. So long as nothing disrupts your supply lines, all is rosy. You might keep a small inventory just as a buffer, but in general, that might only last a day or so.

Economies of Scale was the other concept that really took hold last century, and was the reason why smaller workshops got shut down in favour of making lots of a widget in one central place, and shipping it out to everywhere from that one point.

Again, works great, until something happens in that place where you are doing the manufacturing, or something happens that hampers your ability to shift parts or product around.

The latter in particular took a dark turn when instead of making things close to where the demand was, “we” instead outsourced it, shifting the production to places where the labour was cheapest. As a consequence, many countries are forced to import as they no longer have the expertise or capabilities to manufacture products locally.

Both these concepts were ideas conceived with people wearing rose-coloured glasses, they emphasise cost-cutting over contingency plans on the grounds that disruption to manufacturing and supplies are unlikely events.

The rise of “the world’s factory”

Over time, companies pushed this concept of centralised manufacturing to extremes, whereby they were largely making things in one place. Apple for instance, were leaning heavily on Foxconn in China for the manufacture of their hardware.

None of this is without precedent, when I was growing up, Nike used to cop a lot of flack for the exploitation of workers in various third-world localities.

That said, history has often had something to say about putting all of one’s eggs in a single basket. There’s mostly nothing wrong with having products made in China, the problem is having things made exclusively in China.

At first, products made in China were seen as dodgy knock-offs of things made elsewhere. The same was said of things made in Japan in the 1950s and 1960s… but then Japan improved their systems and processes, and with it, the products they made improved too. In the case of China, initially things were done “cheaply”, which gave rise to a perception that things made in China were all “dodgy”.

Over time, processes again improved, and now there are some great examples of products and services, which are designed and built by people based in China. Stuff that works, and is reliable. There are some very smart people over there who are great at their craft.

That said, manufacturing all revolves around the dollar, and so when it came to cutting costs, something had to give.

Trouble in Xinjiang

With this global demand for manufacturing, China had a problem trying to find people to do the mundane jobs. Quality had to be maintained, and so some organisations over there tried to solve the cost problem a different way: cheaper labour.

Now, it’s well known that China’s government is not a government that particularly values individualism. This is evident in the manner in which the Tienanmen Square protests were so violently silenced.

The Uighur Muslim community is one such group that has been in their sights for a long time. This is a group that has been clamped-down on for more than 6 years. Over time, a narrative was developed that tried to cast this group as being “trouble makers” in need of “re-education”.

Over time, members of this community found themselves co-opted into being the cogs in this “global” factory. At first, such actions were hidden from view, including from the direct customers of these factories.

COVID-19 makes its entrance

So, over time, global manufacturing has shifted to China, in some cases involving forced labour in the effort to drive the cost down and make the end product seem more competitive.

Much of these problems have been hidden from the outside world, but for now, whilst we’re starting to learn of these issues, we still do the majority of our manufacturing in one country.

Then, about this time last year, a bizarre respiratory condition started showing up in Wuhan. Nobody knew much about this condition, other than the fact that it was discovered it was highly contagious.

Even today, we’re still unsure exactly how it came about, but the smart money is that it jumped from some reservoir host such as a bat, via some intermediate host, to humans. Bats in particular are major carriers of all kinds of corona-viruses, and as such, are a highly probably suspect in this.

I do not believe it is synthetic in origin.

COVID-19 threw a major spanner in the works for everybody. Community event calendars looked like an utter train-wreck with cancellations and deferrals all over the place. For me, some of the casualties I was looking forward to include the 2020 Yarraman to Wulkuraka bike ride and numerous endurance horse-riding events (where I assist in operations).

It also threw a major spanner in the works for just-in-time manufacturing (since freight was running inefficiently due to a lack of flights) and rolling shut-downs across China as COVID-19 did its worst.

Some businesses have already closed for good.

Knee-jerk reactions

Numerous countries, notably ours, called for an investigation into the origins and initial handling of the COVID-19 pandemic.

I for one, think such an investigation should go ahead. We owe it to the people who have lost their lives, and those who have lost their livelihoods, to this condition, that we try and find out what went wrong. It’s not about blaming people.

We’re not interested in who made the mistakes, it’s more a question of what the mistakes were. This event will repeat itself again, and again, until such time as we get to understand what “we” (globally) did wrong.

China’s government does not seem to have seen it this way. It’s as if they see it as a witch-hunt. As a result, we as a nation that seems to have been singled-out, with heavy tariffs placed on goods that we as a nation export to China.

Notably absent in this trade-war is iron ore, partially because the other major producer of iron ore, Brazil, has been left a complete basket-case by this pandemic, and Australia was a major supplier of iron ore long before COVID-19 reared its ugly head.

A plan “B”

Right now, things are escalating in this diplomatic row. Whilst the politicians are trying to resolve this with as little fuss as possible, I think China’s position is becoming very clear. They’ve told the world “F You” in no uncertain terms.

We are most definitely dealing with a rebellious and violent teenager, more than capable of smashing holes in a few walls and inflicting grievous bodily harm.

I think it would be wonderful if things could be reset back to the way they were, but at the same time, I think that really, we may need to realise that “peak China” days may be behind us now.

I know there are organisations that have built their entire business model around exports to China, and that literally overnight, conditions have changed which now make that greatly risk business viability.

They are geared around the huge appetite that this country’s people have previously demonstrated for our goods and services. I think now, more than ever, we should be looking around. Where else can I outsource to? Where else can I sell to? How can we make do with less demand?

If China does come around, then sure, maybe a certain portion of your market can be serviced there. I think it folly though to be reliant on one single region for your supply or demand though.

Two or three alternatives may not totally balance things, but having at least a partial income is better than none at all!

The Australian coat-of-arms features the emu and the kangaroo. These animals are quite different from one another, but they share a few common attributes. Yes, some might say they’re two of the less brainy members of the animal kingdom, but also, they are not known for going “backwards”.

Whilst we momentarily look over our shoulder at our past, I think it important that we keep moving “forwards”.

Learning from our mistakes

I think in all of this, it’s fair to say none of us are perfect. Yes, our SAS troops have been implicated in some truly horrendous war crimes. Not all of them, thankfully, but enough to cast a cloud over the military in general. Some of the Army’s chopper pilots are not exactly famous for fast reporting of fires either.

We’re investigating this, and yes, some of the top brass are ducking for cover, as it’s likely some know more than they’ve been letting on. An analysis of what went wrong will be done, and we, collectively, will learn from those mistakes.

In the case of COVID-19, for the first few months of 2020, we were told “No, we don’t need help, we’re fine, we’ve got this!”. Taiwan saw this, and immediately sprang to action, as did many other nations close to China. They’ve seen similar things happen before (SARS, MERS), and so maybe their scepticism shielded them somewhat.

I think one of the biggest lessons of all is to realise that asking for help is not a sign of weakness, it’s a sign of maturity. We’re on this planet, together. We are in this mess, together. We need to work this all out, together.

What am I doing?

So, based on the above… where do I sit? Not on the fence.

I myself have started seriously considering my suppliers.

In particular, I have practically destroyed my credentials for AliExpress, having bought the last few things I’m likely to want from there. I’ve ordered printed circuit boards from a supplier in Hong Kong.

During last year, I had ordered a few PCBs from their sister factory in mainland China as I was concerned about the civil unrest there (and on that, I do think the people there have a valid point to raise) causing delays, but had originally intended to move things back once things settled down. However, with China being so adamant that Hong Kong is “theirs”, I’m forced to treat Hong Kong the same as mainland China.

As such, I’ll probably be looking to the US, Europe or India to evaluate options there. I might still use the old Hong Kong supplier, but they won’t be the sole supplier.

Where possible, I’ll probably be paying more attention to country-of-origin for products I buy from now on, and preferring local options where possible. This won’t always be the case, and some things will have to be imported from China, but I aim to diversify my sources.

I may start making things myself. Yes, time-consuming, expensive, but ultimately, this means I become the master of my own destiny, it’s likely a worthwhile journey to undertake.

Above all, I am not out to discriminate against the people of China. I may not always agree with some of their customs, but that does not give one the right to indulge in racism. My only real complaint with China at this time, is the conduct of its government.

Maybe with time, diplomatic relations might turn this around, and we may see a more co-operative Chinese government, only time will tell on that.

In the meantime, I plan to not reward their government for what I consider, bad behaviour.

Jul 152020
 

At the last federal election, we started seeing this meme floating about the Internet…

“Quexit” meme, (source: ABC)

Of course, we in Queensland can do memes too…

“Vexit” anyone?

That said, one hopes Victoria can get over their COVID-19 issues and come join the rest of us. This isn’t the (Dis)United States of America, this is Australia, we’re one country, and it’s our problem collectively to sort out, so let’s just put our differences aside and get on with it!

Jun 082020
 

Well, it’s been a while since we’ve had a cat in the house. Our establishment has been home to many pets over the years, mostly dogs and cats.

Our last was a domestic moggy named Emma, who we had as a kitten back in 1990 and past away in 2008 a few months short of her 18th birthday. A good innings for a feline!

Recently, my maternal grandmother passed away. She had been living alone since my grandfather had to move to a nursing home, and making a red-hot go of it, but bleeding on the brain eventually caused her demise. She was looking after a cat there, a 5-year old Russian Blue / domestic short-hair cross named Sam.

Just before my grandmothers’ passing, I had raised concerns about his welfare, since no one was in the house looking after him. Apparently he was getting occasional visits to re-fill bowls and take out cat litter trays, but it wasn’t ideal. There was a definite concern that he could be “forgotten”.

My two uncles on that side both have pets that Sam likely would not get along with. My mother has twice as many cats as she’s theoretically allowed. My sister’s husband dislikes cats. Most of my cousins are in rental accommodation. I was one of the few in the family that could take on a cat.

Not ideal for us, because we do go away for WICEN events occasionally and the people we’d have left Emma with are now either passed away or in palliative care. So we’ll have to figure something out when the time comes. But, at least here he’s got human attention, he’s got food, he’s got a clean litter tray, and a bigger house to run around in.

For now, he’s in my name for welfare purposes… the estate isn’t worked out yet (there’s 6 months delay in case someone “contests” the will). I can transfer ownership of him to the person officially inheriting him, but smart money is that’ll be me anyway.

Of course one fun thing is that thanks to a little gift from China, I’m working from home. Right now, the task at hand is developing a Modbus driver, so my “workbench”^W^Wthe dining room table has my laptop, and an industrial PC that’s pretending to be a Modbus/RTU device.

Sam has discovered jumping on the keyboard gets instant attention:

Sam, trying a, errm, paw, at JavaScript
The “JavaScript” code

Yeah, why am I reminded of the FVWM Cats page?

May 122020
 

So, the other day I pondered about whether BlueTrace could be ported to an older device, or somehow re-implemented so it would be compatible with older phones.

The Australian Government has released their version of TraceTogether, COVIDSafe, which is available for newer devices on the Google and Apple application repositories. It suffers a number of technical issues, one glaring one being that even on devices it theoretically supports, it doesn’t work properly unless you have it running in the foreground and your phone unlocked!

Well, there’s a fail right there! Lots of people, actually need to be able to lock their phones. (e.g. a condition of their employment, preventing pocket dials, saving battery life, etc…)

My phone, will never run COVIDSafe, as provided. Even compiling it for Android 4.1 won’t be enough, it uses Bluetooth Low Energy, which is a Bluetooth 4.0 feature. However, the government did one thing right, they have published the source code. A quick fish-eye over the diff against TraceTogether, suggests the changes are largely superficial.

Interestingly, although the original code is GPLv3, our government has decided to supply their own license. I’m not sure how legal that is. Others have questioned this too.

So, maybe I can run it after all? All I need is a device that can do BLE. That then “phones home” somehow, to retrieve tokens or upload data. Newer phones (almost anything Android-based) usually can do WiFi hotspot, which would work fine with a ESP32.

Older phones don’t have WiFi at all, but many can still provide an Internet connection over a Bluetooth link, likely via the LAN Access Profile. I think this would mean my “token” would need to negotiate HTTPS itself. Not fun on a MCU, but I suspect someone has possibly done it already on ESP32.

Nordic platforms are another option if we go the pure Bluetooth route. I have two nRF52840-DK boards kicking around here, bought for OpenThread development, but not yet in use. A nicety is these do have a holder for a CR2032 cell, so can operate battery-powered.

Either way, I think it important that the chosen platform be:

  1. easily available through usual channels
  2. cheap
  3. hackable, so the devices can be re-purposed after this COVID-19 nonsense blows over

A first step might be to see if COVIDSafe can be cleaved in two… with the BLE part running on a ESP32 or nRF52840, and the HTTPS part running on my Android phone. Also useful, would be some sort of staging server so I can test my code without exposing things. Not sure if there is such a beast publicly available that we can all make use of.

Guess that’ll be the next bit to look at.

May 042020
 

Sure, one moment, let’s try your link…

Errm “No such app found”… I think your link is broken guys, please fix! Bear in mind, my phone is one of these. It still makes calls, still sends and receives text messages, still does what I need it to do.

If it doesn’t do what you need it to do, that is not my problem, take that up with Telstra/ZTE.

Apr 242020
 

So today, the US’s head of state suggested this little gem for handling COVID-19…

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-24/trump-questions-whether-disinfectant-could-be-injected/12180630

My suggestion for Trump: you first. You try it… then report back to us!

Disinfectant might work well on hard surfaces, but injecting it into one’s bloodstream is an utterly reckless and stupid thing to do. Yes, it may kill the virus, but it’ll likely kill a lot of other things, including the patient!

Updated: I realise the comment was made “sarcastically“… however I cannot get this image out of my head now!

A US COVID-19 treatment clinic? I think not!
Apr 202020
 

Recently, the US President, Donald Trump, made the decision to pull the US funding from the World Health Organisation. This of course has been widely condemned, and will likely get challenged, but in the meantime it made me wonder what the rest of us could do.

No, I’m not suggesting acts of violence at a “democratically” elected head of state, as tempting to some as that may be.

The US contributed a little under US$900M last year to the WHO. Could we crowd-fund that?

I was thinking about what platform would work best for this, turns out, I don’t need to. The WHO are taking donations directly.

If 40 million of us, world wide, each donate US$25… we will exceed the funding once provided by the U.S.A. Time one president was shown how he’s just another brick in the wall!

We don’t need the U.S.A. to fund the WHO, we just need US. I did my bit… how about you?

https://covid19responsefund.org/

Apr 192020
 

COVID-SARS-2 is a nasty condition caused by COVID-19 that has seen many a person’s life cut short. The COVID-19 virus which originated from Wuhan, China has one particularly insidious trait: it can be spread by asymptomatic people. That is, you do not have to be suffering symptoms to be an infectious carrier of the condition.

As frustrating as isolation has been, it’s really our only viable solution to preventing this infectious condition from spreading like wildfire until we get a vaccine that will finally knock it on the head.

One solution that has been proposed has been to use contract tracing applications which rely on Bluetooth messaging to detect when an infected person comes into contact with others. Singapore developed the TraceTogether application. The Australian Government look like they might be adopting this application, our deputy CMO even suggesting it’d be made compulsory (before the PM poured water on that plan).

Now, the Android version of this, requires Android 5.1. My phone runs 4.1: I cannot run this application. Not everybody is in the habit of using Bluetooth, or even carries a phone. This got me thinking: can this be implemented in a stand-alone device?

The guts of this application is a protocol called BlueTrace which is described in this whitepaper. Reference implementations exist for Android and iOS.

I’ll have to look at the nitty-gritty of it, but essentially it looks like a stand-alone implementation on a ESP32 module maybe a doable proposition. The protocol basically works like this:

  • Clients register using some contact details (e.g. a telephone number) to a server, which then issues back a “user ID” (randomised).
  • The server then uses this to generate “temporary IDs” which are constructed by concatenating the “User ID” and token life-time start/finish timestamps together, encrypting that with the secret key, then appending the IV and an authentication token. This BLOB is then Base64-encoded.
  • The client pulls down batches of these temporary IDs (forward-dated) to use for when it has no Internet connection available.
  • Clients, then exchange these temporary IDs using BLE messaging.

This, looks doable in an ESP32 module. The ESP32 could be loaded up with tokens by a workstation. You then go about your daily business, carrying this device with you. When you get home, you plug the device into your workstation, and it uploads the “temporary IDs” it saw.

I’ll have to dig out my ESP32 module, but this looks like a doable proposition.

Mar 182020
 

I’ve had this stuck in my head all day…one sorta has to pronounce “Corona” as “Crona” to make this work… Apologies to John Carter and The First Class…

Do you remember back in olden day, (wo-oh-oh)
when everybody lived a care-free way (wo-oh-oh)
whatever happened to the boy next door,
now sneezing, hiding behind the bathroom wall!

Remember dancing at the high school hop
The dress I ruined with the soda pop?
Quarantine didn’t mean a thing
Hundreds of people getting in the swing!

Corona baby, Corona baby, give me your hand
let me share what I can remember
Life as before we all got caught
in the lock-down.
Corona baby, Corona baby, you can’t understand
why society was so quick to dismember.
Days in the sun, to lyin’ on our bum every day!