headset

A stereo/binaural tactical headset

One thing I hate doing when I’m taking down notes at a radio comms event is juggling a hand-microphone and pen/paper/tablet/computer simultaneously. So I tend to prefer a headset for my radios rather than a hand-microphone. Some models (especially Kenwood) have lots of selections available, but some are very much restricted. In particular, I prefer a binaural headset as I find it more difficult to hear a voice on one side than via both sides — particularly in noisy conditions. The only options I could find for Yaesu/Alinco sets were big chunky earmuff headsets — great in those noisy situations, but not so great if you need situational awareness.

The plan thus is to cobble together my own binaural tactical headset. Stereo using my standard headset connection, so I can re-use it elsewhere.

I did have a Kenwood TH-D72A — a good solid performer… but sadly no longer manufactured (neither is its successor, not that Kenwood ever sold that here), and my particular specimen now refuses to have anything to do with the internal battery. I bought an Alinco DJ-G7T as a back-up hand-held for pure voice comms, and more recently a Yaesu FT5DR. I had made my own Kenwood headset adaptor to use with my headsets, but I had nothing equivalent for the Alinco or Yaesu sets.

As it happens, the headset pin-out of the Alinco is nearly identical to that of the earlier Yaesu VX-6/VX-7: 3.5mm threaded TRRS. Both radios put the speaker on the tip, microphone+PTT (in series) on the sleeve-most ring and 0V on the sleeve. Alinco use the tip-most ring for a 3.3V rail, whereas Yaesu use this same ring for a data/clone connection. Maybe it’s a UART which “idles” at 3.3V on Yaesu rigs, but I wouldn’t bet on all Yaesu accessories working on Alinco and vice-versa — however headsets rarely need a 3.3V rail. (Maybe the VOX ones do… not sure.)

The FT5DR is actually compatible with the earlier VX-6/VX-7, however the connector is on the side of the radio, and while the threaded 3.5mm connectors fit, they stick out the side like a sore thumb: a right-angled 3.5mm TRRS is a better “fit”.

Luckily, Amazon have quite a few options that convert these radios to a U94 “Nexus” military-style connector. I managed to pick up a U94 adaptor that works quite well with the Alinco, and does work with the Yaesu (although is mechanically not optimal due to the “straight” style of the plug and side-mounting of the socket).

Tactical headsets come in a few varieties:

  • ear-tube covert-style headsets
  • D-loop style
  • throat-mic headsets
  • “bowman”-style headband headsets
  • earmuff-style headsets
  • motorcycle headsets

The only ones of this list that are binaural out-of-the-box are the earmuff headsets and the motorcycle headsets. I figured I’d pick up a couple of cheap “bowman”-style ones and see if I can cobble two mono headsets into one stereo set. I looked around, and bought two of these.

The adaptor turned up a week or so ago, and the headsets turned up today. There’s two different varieties of pin-out for the U94 connector — the “NATO” standard interleaves the speaker and microphone pins, whereas the “civilian” standard puts the speaker on the sleeve/sleeve-most ring and microphone on the tip-most ring/tip. Both adaptor and headset turned out to be “civilian” standard, so the first hurdle was cleared.

I tested both headsets and confirmed they both worked. I tried the headsets both with voice comms, then tried tuning to a local FM broadcast station to assess audio quality. They work, but audio quality is not what I’d call wonderful. Very tinny, fine for voice comms, but maybe telephone quality at best. Ookay, so using these as a stereo headset can be done — but if I wanted to use them for anything but straight voice comms, I’d want to swap the speakers out for something decent. Tear-down time!

I picked a “victim” and attempted to disassemble it. These units appear to be glued together, so you wind up partially destroying them to get at the speaker:

The speaker is a conventional 8ohm 500mW jobbie, nothing remarkable… and a frequency response that’s truly awful for anything other than voice comms. Fine for the intended task, but as I say, not really sufficient for what I was after.

I’ll see if I can swap this speaker out with one liberated from some headphones and see about replacing the strip of plastic I had to unceremoniously and destructively rip out — this shouldn’t be a difficult job. The other thing that might help is some sound-damping material behind the speaker, which might account for some tinniness.

If I get this headset working acceptably, I’ll do the same mod to the other, then can look at wiring the two together into a stereo set using a DIN-5 matching my other headsets. I can then re-purpose the U94 plug to make an adaptor to convert my other headsets to use with the U94 adaptors.

A building-block for DIY Bluetooth audio devices

I’m a late adopter of Bluetooth, having previously tried Bluetooth in its earlier days, hearing something that sounded like my music was being fed down a drain pipe, and deciding that Bluetooth was rubbish… it wasn’t until I bought a Logitech H830 headset that I found that Bluetooth can actually sound decent… moreover when I bought the Logitech Zone Wireless, that bi-directional Bluetooth can also sound decent.

Now, the Zone Wireless is fine if I’m in the office, or out walking somewhere. It’ll fit underneath the coolie hat if I decide to wear that, otherwise it works with a cap just fine. BUT, if I’m camping or at a WICEN event, I’m often wearing a full-brim hard hat. The headband on the Zone Wireless is a problem.

I really wanted a Bluetooth device that could be put on a lanyard, and I just plug in a regular common-garden variety wired headset. The closest I can get to this is a motorcycle headset — as these have to accommodate a wide variety of helmet styles, the radio module and the headset are actually separate components, and so conceivably, I can make my own compatible adaptor to plug in. Then, it wouldn’t matter… want to wear the hard hat? No problem, I already have modded earmuffs with a headset. Want to use it on the bike? Sure, plug the helmet straight in. Or am I in the office again? No problem, normal headset.

It’d also be nice to share that wired headset with a wired audio device… prime example here is a radio transceiver. Yes, there are devices that will make those do Bluetooth… and there are radios that have Bluetooth. I had one of the latter: Yaesu VX8-DR … it’s Bluetooth was next to useless… idiosyncratic and unreliable.

I see the Sena SR-10 mentioned in a few places as a way to “Bluetooth-enable” a two-way radio… but aside from being pricey, I see three complaints being raised: unreliable/slow pairing, intermittent darlek-like distortion on transmit and a noticeable connection delay on incoming signals.

I pondered doing my own… and I’ve slowly amassed parts to do exactly that. But, the other day, I stumbled on another option: Altronics sell a CSR8635 Bluetooth module. This advertises the ability to talk to two Bluetooth devices, and wideband voice. CSR’s own datasheet seems to give some hints as to how it can be used.

One catch, is the pads on this device are a 1mm spacing — so mounting this on some perfboard is going to be a big challenge. I prefer the minimalism of a module like this over a Raspberry Pi Zero W… a lot less to go wrong, and likely much better battery life.

Building my own wireless headset interface

So, I’ve been wanting to do this for the better part of a decade… but lately, the cost of more capable embedded devices has come right down to make this actually feasible.

It’s taken a number of incarnations, the earliest being the idea of DIYing it myself with a UHF-band analogue transceiver. Then the thought was to pair a I²S audio CODEC with a ESP8266 or ESP32.

I don’t want to rely on technology that might disappear from the market should relations with China suddenly get narky, and of course, time marches on… I learn about protocols like ROC. Bluetooth also isn’t what it was back when I first started down this path — back then A2DP was one-way and sounded terrible, HSP was limited to 8kHz mono audio.

Today, Bluetooth headsets are actually pretty good. I’ve been quite happy with the Logitech Zone Wireless for the most part — the first one I bought had a microphone that failed, but Logitech themselves were good about replacing it under warranty. It does have a limitation though: it will talk to no more than two Bluetooth devices. The USB dongle it’s supplied with, whilst a USB Audio class device, also occupies one of those two slots.

The other day I spent up on a DAB+ radio and a shortwave radio — it’d be nice to listen to these via the same Bluetooth headset I use for calls and the tablet. There are Bluetooth audio devices that I could plug into either of these, then pair with my headset, but I’d have to disconnect either the phone or the tablet to use it.

So, bugger it… the wireless headset interface will get an upgrade. The plan is a small pocket audio swiss-army-knife that can connect to…

  • an analogue device such as a wired headset or radio receiver/transceiver
  • my phone via Bluetooth
  • my tablet via Bluetooth
  • the aforementioned Bluetooth headset
  • a desktop PC or laptop over WiFi

…and route audio between them as needs require.

The device will have a small LCD display for control with a directional joystick button for control, and will be able to connect to a USB host for management.

Proposed parts list

The chip crisis is actually a big limitation, some of the bits aren’t as easily available as I’d like. But, I’ve managed to pull together the following:

The only bit that’s old stock is the LCD, it’s been sitting on my shelf gathering dust for over a decade. Somewhere in one of my junk boxes I’ve got some joystick buttons also bought many years ago.

Proposed software

For the sake of others looking to duplicate my efforts, I’ll stick with Raspberry Pi OS. As my device is an ARMv6 device, I’ll have to stick with the 32-bit release. Not that big a deal, and long-term I’ll probably look at using OpenEmbedded or Gentoo Embedded long-term to make a minimalist image that just does what I need it to do.

The starter kit came with a SD card loaded with NOOBS… I ignored this and just flashed the SD card with a bare minimum Debian Bullseye image. The plan is I’ll get PipeWire up and running on this for its Bluetooth audio interface. Then we’ll try and get the hardware bits going.

Right now, I have the zero booting up, connecting to my local WiFi network, and making itself available via SSH. A good start.

Data sheet for the LCD

The LCD will possibly be one of the more challenging bits. This is from a phone that was new last century! As it happens though, Bergthaller Iulian-Alexandru was kind enough to publish some details on a number of LCD screens. Someone’s since bought and squatted the domain, but The Wayback Machine has an archive of the site.

I’ve mirrored his notes on various Ericsson LCDs here:

The diagrams on that page appear to show the connections as viewed from the front of the LCD panel. I guess if I let magic smoke out, too bad! The alternative is I do have two Nokia 3310s floating around, so harvest the LCDs out of them — in short, I have a fallback plan!

PipeWire on the Pi Zero

This will be the interesting bit. Not sure how well it’ll work, but we’ll give it a shot. The trickiest bit is getting binaries for the device, no one builds for armhf yet. There are these binaries for Ubuntu AMD64, and luckily there are source packages available.

I guess worst case scenario is I put the Pi Zero W aside and get a Pi Zero 2 W instead. Key will be to test PipeWire first before I warm up the soldering iron, let’s at least prove the software side of things, maybe using USB audio devices in place of the AudioInjector board.

I’m going through and building the .debs for armhf myself now, taking notes as I go. I’ll post these when I’m done.

Re-building a Logitech Headset – Part III

So, a while back I tore apart an old Logitech wireless headset with the intention of using its bits to make a wireless USB audio interface. I was undecided whether the headset circuitry would “live” in a new headset, or whether it’d be a separate unit to which I could attach any headset.

I ended up doing the latter. I found through Mouser a suitable enclosure for the original circuitry and have fitted it with cable glands and sockets for the charger input (which now sports a standard barrel jack) and a DIN-5 connector for the earpiece/microphone connections.

The first thing to do was to get rid of that proprietary power connector. The two outer contacts are the +6V and 0V pins, shown here in orange and white/orange coloured cable respectively. I used a blob of heat-melt glue to secure it so I didn’t rip pads off.

Replacing the power connector. +6V is orange, 0V is orange/white.

The socket is “illuminated” by a LED on the PCB. Maybe I’ll look at some sort of light-pipe arrangement to bring that outside, we’ll see.

The other end, just got wired to a plain barrel jack. Future improvement might be to put a 6V DC-DC converter, allowing me to plug in any old 12V source, but for now, this’ll do. I just have to remember to watch what lead I grab. Whilst I was there, I also put in a cable gland for the audio interface connection.

Power socket and audio connections mounted in case.

One challenge with the board design is that there is not one antenna, but two, plus some rather lumpy tantalum capacitors near the second antenna. I suspect the two antennas are for handling polarisation, which will shift as you move your head and as the signal propagates. Either way, they meant the PCB wouldn’t sit “flat”. No problem, I had some old cardboard boxes which provided the solution:

PCB spacer, with cut-out for high-clearance parts.

The cardboard is a good option since it’s readily available and won’t attenuate the 2.4GHz signal much. It was also easy to work with.

I haven’t exposed the three push-buttons on that side of the PCB at this stage. I suppose drilling a hole and making a small “poker” to hit the buttons isn’t out of the question. This isn’t much different to what Logitech’s original case did. I’ll tackle that later. I need a similar solution for the slide-switch used for power.

One issue I faced was wrangling the now over-length FFC that linked the two sides. Previously, this spanned the headband, but now it only needed to reach a few centimetres at most. Eyeballing the original cable, I found this short replacement. I’ll have to figure out how to mount that floating PCB somehow, but at least it’s a clean solution.

Replacement FFC.

At this point, it was a case of finish wiring everything up. I haven’t tried any audio as yet, that will come in time. It still powers up, sees the transceiver, so there’s still “life” in this.

Powering up post-surgery.

I plugged it into its charger and let it run for a while just to top the LiPo cell.

Charging for the first time since mounting.

One thing I’m not happy with is the angle the battery is sitting at, since it’s just a bit wider than the space between the mounting posts. I might try shaving some material off the posts to see if I can get the battery to sit “flat”. I only need about 1mm, which should still allow enough clearance for the screwdriver and screw to pass the cell safely.

The polarity of the speakers is a guess on my part. Neither end seemed to be grounded, hopefully the drivers don’t mind being “common-ed”, otherwise I might need to cram some small isolation transformers in there.

Re-building a Logitech Headset – Part II

So, today I was doing some work for my workplace, when a critical 4G modem-router dropped offline, cutting me off. Figuring it was a temporary issue, I thought I’d resume this headset rebuild.

The replacement battery had turned up a few weeks back, a beefy 1000mAh 3.7V LiPo pack intended for Raspberry Pi PiJuice battery supplies. This pack was chosen because it has a similar arrangement to the original Logitech battery: single cell with a 10k thermistor. As a bonus, the pack appears to be at least triple the original cell’s capacity. I just had to wire it up.

The new battery being charged by the headset circuitry

The connectors are not compatible, being both physically different sizes and the thermistor and 0V pins being swapped. Black and Red are the same conventions on both packs, that is, red for +3.7V and black for 0V… the thermister connects to the blue wire on the old pack and yellow on the new pack.

I’m at two minds whether to embed the electronics directly into the earmuffs, or whether to just wire the microphone/speaker connections to a DIN-5 connector to make it compatible with my other headsets.

For now at least, the battery is charging, not getting hot, and the circuitry detects the base transceiver when it is plugged into a laptop USB port, so the circuitry is still “functional”.

Re-building a Logitech Headset

So, lately I’ve been working from home, which means amongst other things, playing music as loud as I like, not getting distracted by co-workers, and the kettle a short walking distance from my workspace.

Eventually though, I will have to return to the office. For this aim, I’ll need to be able to “drown out” the background noise. Music is good for this, but not everyone is into the same tastes as I am — I am a bit of a music luddite.

Years ago (when the ink was drying on my foundation license) I purchased a Logitech Wireless headset. Model A-00006 (yes, that is quite old now). This headset worked, but it did have two flaws:

  1. the audio isolation wasn’t great, so they tended to “leak” sound
  2. they had the dreaded asymmetric audio sample rate problem with JACK.

Now, for home use I bought a much nicer set which solves issue (2) and isn’t too bad with (1), but I’d like to keep them home. (2) isn’t a problem at work since I don’t generally have the need for the audio routing I use at home. So (2) isn’t going to be a problem.

This headset sat in a box for some years, and over time, the headband and earpads have fallen to bits. The electronics are still good. What if I bought a pair of earmuffs and stuffed the old headset guts inside those? That’d solve issue (1) nicely.

Getting inside

These things didn’t open up without a fight. I found that where the speakers are concerned, you will permanently break the housing. The two sides are joined by a 8-wire ribbon cable. The majority of the electronics is in the right-hand side. The battery is most of the guts of the left side.

You’ll need to destroy the headband to liberate the ribbon cable, and you’ll need to destroy the speakers’ housing to get at the screws behind.

I now have the un-housed headset guts sitting on the table, with the original charger plugged in charging the very flat battery, which is a single-cell 3.7V LiPo pouch cell; no idea what capacity it is, I doubt it’s more than 200mAh.

Charging

I plugged everything back together and tried the headset out. It still works, although instead of indicating a solid amber LED for charging, it was showing a slow blink.

fccid.io has a copy of the original documentation online, as well as photos of the guts here. In that, it did not discuss what a “slow blink” meant, which had me concerned that maybe the battery had been left too long and was no longer safe to charge.

Battery voltage whilst charging is sitting around 4.2V, which sounds fair for a 3.7V cell. It eventually stops blinking, going solid, but then the other LED turns RED. Disconnecting the battery reveals 0V across the pins.

So I might be up for a new battery, the PiJuice batteries look to be a similar arrangement (single cell with termistor pin) and may be a good upgrade anyway.

Next steps

I prefer the microphone on the right-hand side, so that’s one thing I’ll be looking at changing. The ribbon cable connects using small FPC connectors, so I’m thinking I might see if I can de-solder those and put a beefier 2.54″ KK-style connector in its place. This will require soldering some wire-wrap wire up to the pins, but the advantage is it’s a much easier connector to work with.

The break-out board on the left side is very simple, no components other than a momentary switch for detecting the microphone boom position, and pads to which the left speaker, microphone, mute LED and battery connect. I’ll still put the battery in the left side, so there’ll still be 5 wires running across the headband. It should be easier to interface with a new battery as well doing this.

I will also have to bring the buttons and switch out to the outside of the earcup, so I’ll probably use KK connectors for those too. The power switch is a through-hole part, so that should be easy.

I’ll probably replace the proprietary power connector with a barrel jack too. Not sure if these will charge from 5V, the original charger has a 6V output.

I think once I’ve got more hacker-friendly connectors onto this, I should be able to look at readying the new home for the electronics.