Jun 022019
 

There’s a couple of truths in life:

  • You don’t get to choose your biological family
  • You don’t get to choose your place of birth

Now, as it happens I ordinarily do not have any real issues with my family or my place of birth, except on one matter: I have never possessed a driver’s license, and really don’t wish to obtain one.

I can get around just fine on my bicycle when I need to. That mode of transport is not nearly as limiting as people think it is. Sure, it’ll take me longer to get places, and I need to perhaps do more planning than most, but I can get where I’m needed.

Yet, time and time again, I run up against the same problem: people assume that people my age, drive cars. People then make the leap to suggest that you’re a useless person if you don’t drive.

I did try to obtain a learner’s permit some time ago. I tried the written test twice: at $20 a pop, at a time when I was unemployed. I wasn’t sure how I was going to fund obtaining a vehicle and paying the necessary fees, but I figured I’d try the first step.

I failed both attempts on one question.

I decided that an identity card was more important: I researched what documentation was required, paid my dues, handed over said documentation, wandered out with a new 18+ card. I figured if I needed to try the driver’s license again, I’d be back.

That was in December 2007. The requirements for obtaining a license have since become more onerous, and let’s face it, there are too many cars on the road today. I’d be looking at taking about 200 hours off from work in order to get the necessary log-book time up and spending tens of thousands of dollars on driving lessons. It isn’t financially worth it.

I re-discovered cycling about 6 months later. I bought a folding bicycle, and started using that to get around, and realised that this was a viable mode of transport for me. Over time, I did longer and longer trips.

The longest I’ve gone unsupported was about 82km. A ride from my home at The Gap to the park at Logan Central takes about 3 hours each way with a couple of rest stops en route. I get going early, take my time, and get there without any trouble.

My work is at Milton, a run of about 10km: I can get there in an hour: faster than public transport. In the early mornings, my times tend to be closer to 45 minutes.

In short, there is just no useful purpose for me to have a car. More to the point, I’d have nowhere to park it. What limited space is available at the front of our property is occupied by a caravan and the neighbours’ numerous cars. If it weren’t for the caravan in fact, it would be all cars belonging to the neighbours.

Moreover, my body actually needs the physical exercise. It’s a fact that moving around is required to keep bodily functions working. You don’t move around enough: bowel movements slow down. I already had one bowel-related health scare this year.

I have not been riding much lately due to scheduling — and I feel my health is suffering greatly because of it.

In spite of this, I still get people, family included, shaking their metaphorical car keys in my face suggesting I should be driving too.

It’s as if, as a non-driver, you’re not welcome in this society. You’re seen as a waste of space — you don’t belong here. We’re seen as “shits” that are there wasting other peoples’ money.

I’ve had a lifetime of that sort of treatment for numerous reasons.

Back in the late 80s, the argument was that I had an Autism diagnosis, therefore I should be going into institutionalised care. Then the same condition was used to argue that I belonged in a special school. At high school, the same reasoning was probably used to put me in the lowest-grade maths and English classes.

I am generally able to focus on a task and do it well. This is probably the reason why I wound up doing double Bachelor-level IT/electronics degrees at uni, and passing both.

I could have instead just been institutionalised. Occupying a tax-payer funded bed. I’d be a record in the NDIS system today. Completely un-employable, generally useless. Definitely not earning >$60000/year doing full-stack software development. There is income tax being paid amongst that — whether my day job is actually worth what I get paid is a debate I’ll leave for others.

The fact remains that I work for a living, and pay my own way.

However, there is a difference to laying out a PCB or writing a code module; and manoeuvring ~600kg of metal travelling at 50+km/hr through suburban roads. One requires focus and patience, the other requires millisecond-level decision-making and reaction times.

I am not someone who thinks well at speed, and I would make no friends driving a car along Waterworks Road at 30km/hr in the morning peak-hour traffic. At 30-40km/hr, I can just manage on the bicycle. I can do up to 60km/hr, but I’m not comfortable at all going that speed!

In a car, you are expected to do the speed limit (50-60km/hr in the case of Waterworks Road). Brisbane’s drivers are not forgiving of anyone who can’t “keep up”.

There are people who have no place driving a car, and I would count myself as being a member of that group. I avoid being on the roads much of the time for that very reason — as a courtesy to drivers who would likely prefer to not be stuck behind a slow cyclist like myself.

Coupled with the health problems: me taking up driving would be an early death sentence. If this is really what is expected, I might as well stop now and get the dying bit over and done with, it’ll be one less person on this planet consuming ever dwindling resources.

It’ll be more humane for me to just quietly go, then to be constantly in and out of medical care for “this” medical condition, or “that” medical condition, costing my employer sick-leave, costing my health fund, occupying resources in our health system, simply because I didn’t get enough exercise.

If a non-driver like me is as useless as people make out, then I guess it won’t hurt anyone that I’m gone. … or maybe we can re-think the “non-drivers are useless” concept. One of the ideas in this paragraph is wrong. I’ve given up trying to decide which!