Jun 282018
 

So this evening, I got a bit of marketing from Telstra. This was to an email address I had used to register the SIM card that I’m trying out in the Kite. I naturally followed the same approach I have with other such suppliers as an anti-phishing tactic.

The email is not unsolicited, but it is a commercial email nonetheless. I figured I’d just quietly opt-out, no need to make a fuss. The email itself was legitimate, so no concern about boobytrapped unsubscribe links. Naturally, I copied the address from their email and paste it into the form on their webpage. I get told this:

Errm, excuse me? That is the email address that I wish to unsubscribe, and if it were invalid, I would not be trying to unsubscribe because I would not have gotten the email in the first place!

Okay, so I’ll need to go through a human to get this resolved, what joy. Navigate the labyrinth that is the Telstra support site (they really don’t want you to be able to make complaints), and I get to a complaints form. First thing I note, they forgot to close an <a> tag (end of line 154)…

<p>If you require immediate assistance with a complaint, <b>Consumer customers</b> can call us anytime on 132200 and say "complaint".<br><br>
If you are a <b>Business customer</b> and require immediate assistance with a complaint, you can call us anytime on 132000 and say "complaint".</p>
<b>Enterprise and Government customers:</b> please go to your specialised contact page <a href="https://www.telstra.com.au/business-enterprise/contact-us/make-a-complaint" target="_self">here</a>.
&nbsp;
<p>Further information on how we handle complaints can be found in our <a href="https://www.telstra.com.au/content/dam/tcom/personal/help/pdf/telstra-complaint-handling-process.pdf">complaints handling process document (PDF).</p></pre>
</div>
<div id="surveyMainDiv" class="main-background">
<div class="place-holder-div" id="surveyMainDivBannerDiv"></div>
<div id="surveyContentDiv" class="content-background">

As a result, Firefox thinks everything to the end of the form, is part of the link! They also close a tag that isn’t open: <pre>.

UPDATE 2018-07-07: This has now been fixed.

Right, so there’s two things. I persevere with the form, resorting to keyboard shortcuts since clicking on any form element brings up that PDF.

Happy that I’ve covered what I wanted to say, I hit the submit. Only to find out the same person who designed the last form, must have designed this one too.

Great, so that’s now three things to complain about.

What really saddens me with Telstra is that today their management tell us they “aspire to be a technology company”. The fact that years ago, Telecom Australia was very much a respected member of the ITU meant it pretty much was a technology company… and the fact they can’t get something as basic as email address validation or a simple web form right, really does show how far they have fallen.

I fully expect this will go back-and-forth while they ask for my browser details (irrelevant, this is broken HTML at their end), my OS (again irrelevant), and then the claim that: “Ohh, we don’t support that!” Which will hold about as much water as a tissue paper G-string.


So, an update. I had a reply back, basically they stated a few things:

  1. they claim to not have seen any marketing emails for the past two months sent to me. (how hard did they look?)
  2. they claim to have taken my name off the list (we’ll see)

They make no comment about fixing the forms. The complaints form now has its closing </a> tag back, so clicking on form elements no longer causes it to pop up with a PDF download. Great, 1 problem of 3 fixed.

I finally had a moment to reply, and did so. In their email, they give an address to send the reply to (because we’re to cool to set the Reply-To header or use the correct From address):

I got back an immediate response:

Delivery has failed to these recipients or distribution lists:

ComplaintResolutionCentre@team.telstra.com
The recipient’s e-mail address was not found in the recipient’s e-mail system. Microsoft Exchange will not try to redeliver this message for you. Please check the e-mail address and try resending this message, or provide the following diagnostic text to your system administrator.


Sent by Microsoft Exchange Server 2007

Diagnostic information for administrators:

Generating server: srv.dir.telstra.com

ComplaintResolutionCentre@team.telstra.com
#550 5.1.1 RESOLVER.ADR.RecipNotFound; not found ##

Original message headers:

Received: from ipani.tcif.telstra.com.au (10.97.216.198) by
 ties-smtp.in.telstra.com.au (172.49.40.197) with Microsoft SMTP Server id
 8.3.485.1; Sat, 7 Jul 2018 17:58:02 +1000
Received: from ipocni.tcif.telstra.com.au ([10.97.216.53])  by
 ipbani.tcif.telstra.com.au with ESMTP; 07 Jul 2018 17:58:02 +1000
X-IronPort-Anti-Spam-Filtered: true
X-IronPort-Anti-Spam-Result: =?us-ascii?q?A0GkBACJcUBb/+KwZZaFN5wRlRWBaTKBT?=
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 =?us-ascii?q?IB1eCWYo0hF4Pg1eBKA6YUIQOgmt2imKIYIUYPYIxoUUCDRsDggU?=
X-IPAS-Result: =?us-ascii?q?A0GkBACJcUBb/+KwZZaFN5wRlRWBaTKBTYYSBgMCAgKGSwt?=
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X-IronPort-AV: E=Sophos;i="5.51,320,1526306400"; 
   d="png'150?scan'150,208,217,150";a="119258049"
X-Amp-Result: UNKNOWN
X-Amp-Original-Verdict: FILE UNKNOWN
X-Amp-File-Uploaded: False
X-SBRS: None
Received: from eth2015.qld.adsl.internode.on.net (HELO
 mail.longlandclan.id.au) ([150.101.176.226])  by ipxcno.tcif.telstra.com.au
 with ESMTP; 07 Jul 2018 17:57:59 +1000
Received: from [IPv6:2001:44b8:21ac:7053:a64e:31ff:fe53:99cc] (unknown
 [IPv6:2001:44b8:21ac:7053:a64e:31ff:fe53:99cc])	by mail.longlandclan.id.au
 (Postfix) with ESMTPSA id C159B51F720	for
 <ComplaintResolutionCentre@team.telstra.com>; Sat,  7 Jul 2018 17:57:56 +1000
 (EST)
Subject: [SR 1-1580842703975] Re: Follow Up-Your complaint with Telstra
References: <1e3d0bcc-a187-42cb-ac52-1e1ef0f4673b@wsmsg3704.srv.dir.telstra.com>
To: <ComplaintResolutionCentre@team.telstra.com>
From: Stuart Longland <me@mydomain.org>
Openpgp: id=77102FB21549FFDE5E13B83A0C7F53F4F359B8EF;
 url=https://stuartl.longlandclan.id.au/key.asc
Message-ID: <b5da1c9c-bc3d-8b2f-0f56-55361dc16503@longlandclan.id.au>
Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2018 17:57:51 +1000
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64; rv:52.0) Gecko/20100101
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MIME-Version: 1.0
In-Reply-To: <1e3d0bcc-a187-42cb-ac52-1e1ef0f4673b@wsmsg3704.srv.dir.telstra.com>
Content-Type: multipart/mixed;
	boundary="------------37DC9E91B74192D682B54693"
Content-Language: en-GB
Return-Path: me@mydomain.org
Reporting-MTA: dns;srv.dir.telstra.com
Received-From-MTA: dns;ipani.tcif.telstra.com.au
Arrival-Date: Sat, 7 Jul 2018 07:58:02 +0000

Final-Recipient: rfc822;ComplaintResolutionCentre@team.telstra.com
Action: failed
Status: 5.1.1
Diagnostic-Code: smtp;550 5.1.1 RESOLVER.ADR.RecipNotFound; not found

Oops… so there’s another complaint:

I note there’s another address (with an ‘s’ on the end) in the footer of the email, and so I have sent them the following:

Hi,
It's taken a little while to get back to you on this as I've been flat
out, but here goes.

On 07/07/18 17:20, Telstra_Notifications wrote:
> Your complaint with Telstra
>
> Reference no: SR x-xxxxxxxxxxxxx
>
> Dear Mr Longland,
>
> Thank you for getting in touch with us on 28 June 2018 about a
> complaint relating to your Telstra account number xxxx xxxxx xxxx.
>
> I’m sorry that you’ve experienced an issue with your service, but
> I'm pleased to offer you the following resolution.

To be clear, the issue is not with the mobile service itself, that's
been fine for the purpose I've used it. The issue is in the marketing
that came with it, that was unwanted.

> You were concerned that:
>
> * You’d like to be removed from Telstra’s marketing list

Yes, this is correct. It might be polite to ask people when they sign
up whether they want to be on this marketing list or not.

In my case, the service is temporary: I have the loan of a prototype
mobile phone: iSquare Mobility Kite v1.

http://www.kiteboard.io/ is the device being trialled.

The manufacturer has loaned it so that I can trial the device on the
Australian mobile networks, and see how it performs in weak-signal
conditions. I have loan of it possibly for another month or so at most.

(So far, it performs *MUCH* better than the ZTE T83 I use, and holds its
own against the ZTE T84 which uses the same chipset as the Kite.)

I'd have used my own SIM card, but my card is too big to fit in this
phone (mine is a miniature SIM, this phone requires a micro-SIM), and
given its temporary custody, it made no sense to get my existing Telstra
service moved to a new SIM.

Thus for this purpose, I just activated a pre-paid service to be able to
try the device out. I also have a service activated with Optus as it's
a dual-SIM device.

Once iSquare Mobility ask for the return of the device, naturally I'll
have little use for the two pre-paid SIM cards that are presently in it,
and won't have any interest of any offers from Telstra (or Optus).

I have an old 3G phone I can possibly use up the remaining credit of the
Telstra SIM in, otherwise I'll just use my current phone service which
I've had since 2001.

> * Telstra should fix broken complaints form
>
> I've confirmed that:
>
> * We have checked your account and found no marketing emails sent to
> you for the past two months

Allow me to present exhibit A; sent Thu, 28 Jun 2018 00:39:53 -0700.
This is attached.

I'm a little surprised your list management software had trouble finding
it, unless of course, you didn't read the complaint message carefully to
see the address my account was *actually* registered under.

I see you don't mention the issues with the form. One issue makes the
form damn-near unusable for anyone due to malformed HTML causing the
entire form to act as a hyperlink to the complaints information PDF.

The other, prevented me from self-unsubscribing and was the reason for
the complaint in the first place.

Don't worry, the world already knows:
Telstra: another mob that didn’t get the RFC5233 memo
I see the missed tag on the complaint form has now been corrected. The original issue that started this, so far has not been corrected. I've attached screenshots for your reference. > We know you've been put out by this matter so we'd like to fix things > by: > > * Confirming the medium of marketing (SMS, Email, phone call, MMS, > face to face marketing, etc) and date you received it This is email marketing. There have not been any other forms of marketing. > * Removing your name and details from Telstra’s marketing list. > Please be advised that this is only applicable for Telstra marketing > calls. Yep, I understand this. This is a silent number, and a temporary one at that. By Christmas time, this service will be no-more, as it will be surplus to requirements. > If you’d like to talk more about this or accept this offer, please > contact me on 1800 241 787* PIN 5172 or email > ComplaintResolutionCentre@team.telstra.com quoting your Telstra > reference SR x-xxxxxxxxxxxxx number. I'm available Tuesday-Saturday, > 9am-5pm (AEST). For reference, ComplaintResolutionCentre@team.telstra.com bounces. I've attached the bounce message I received, and have also submitted it as SR x-xxxxxxxxxxxxx just in case this email doesn't get through. So that's now 4 issues in total, with 1 resolved so far. If you could fix up the broken email validation on the opt-out form and complaints form, and fix the broken email address in your reply messages then that will resolve the remaining issues. Thanks in advance. Regards, -- Stuart Longland (aka Redhatter, VK4MSL) I haven't lost my mind... ...it's backed up on a tape somewhere.
Jun 142018
 

So, last Sunday we did a trip up the Brisbane Valley to do a rekkie for the Yarraman to Wulkuraka bike ride that Brisbane WICEN will be assisting in at the end of next month.

The area is known to be quite patchy where phone reception is concerned, with Linville shown to be highly unreliable… Telstra recommends external antennas are required to get any sort of service.  So it seemed a good place to take the Kite and try it out in a weak signal area.

3G coverage in Linville, with external antenna.

4G coverage in Linville, with external antenna.

4GX coverage in Linville, with external antenna.

Sadly, I didn’t get as much time as I would have liked to perform these tests, and it would have been great to compare against a few others… but I was able to take some screenshots on the way up of the three phones, all on the same network (Telstra), using their internal antennas (and the small whip in the case of the Kite).  However, we got there in the afternoon, and there were clouds gathering, so we had to get to Moore.

In any case, Telstra seems to have pulled their socks up since those maps were updated… as I found I was getting reasonable coverage on the T83.  The Kite was in the car at the time, I didn’t want it getting damaged if I came off the bike or if the heavens opened up.

I did manage to take some screenshots on the three phones on the way up.

This is not that scientific, and a bit crude since I couldn’t take the screenshots at exactly the same moment.  Plus, we were travelling at 100km/hr for much of the run.  There was one point where we stopped for breakfast at Fernvale, I can’t recall exactly what time that was or whether I got a screenshot from all three phones at that time.

The T84 is the only phone out of the three that can do the 4GX 700MHz band.

Time ZTE T83 ZTE T84 iSquare Mobility Kite v1 Notes
2018-06-10T06:08:16 t83 at 2018-06-10T06:08:16 Leaving Brisbane
2018-06-10T06:09:24 kite at 2018-06-10T06:09:24
2018-06-10T06:09:33 t83 at 2018-06-10T06:09:33
2018-06-10T06:26:17 t83 at 2018-06-10T06:26:17
2018-06-10T06:26:25 kite at 2018-06-10T06:26:25
2018-06-10T07:30:27 t84 at 2018-06-10T07:30:27 A rare moment where the T84 beats the others.  My guess is this is a 4GX (700MHz) cell.
2018-06-10T07:30:34 kite at 2018-06-10T07:30:34
2018-06-10T07:30:39 t83 at 2018-06-10T07:30:39
2018-06-10T07:41:48 kite at 2018-06-10T07:41:48
2018-06-10T07:41:54 t84 at 2018-06-10T07:41:54 HSPA coverage… one of the few times we see the T84 drop back to 3G.
2018-06-10T07:42:01 t83 at 2018-06-10T07:42:01
2018-06-10T07:51:34 t83 at 2018-06-10T07:51:34 Patchy coverage at times en route to Moore.
2018-06-10T07:51:45 kite at 2018-06-10T07:51:45
2018-06-10T08:24:57 kite at 2018-06-10T08:24:57 For grins, trying out Optus coverage on the Kite at Moore.  There’s a tower at Benarkin, not sure if there’s one closer to Moore.
2018-06-10T08:25:39 kite at 2018-06-10T08:25:39
2018-06-10T08:54:28 t84 at 2018-06-10T08:54:28
2018-06-10T08:54:35 kite at 2018-06-10T08:54:35 En route to Benarkin, we lose contact with Telstra on all three devices.
2018-06-10T08:54:39 t83 at 2018-06-10T08:54:39
2018-06-10T09:35:14 kite at 2018-06-10T09:35:14 In Benarkin.
2018-06-10T09:35:22 t83 at 2018-06-10T09:35:22
2018-06-10T10:25:27 kite at 2018-06-10T10:25:27
2018-06-10T10:25:48 t83 at 2018-06-10T10:25:48

So what does the above show?  Well, for starters, it is apparent that the T83 gets left in the dust by both devices.  This is interesting as my T83 definitely was the more reliable on our last trip into the Snowy Mountains, regularly getting a signal in places where the T84 failed.

Two spots I’d love to take the Kite would be Dumboy Creek (4km outside Delungra on the Gwydir Highway) and Sawpit Creek (just outside Jindabyne), but both are a bit far for a day trip!  It’s unlikely I’ll be venturing that far south again this year.

On this trip up the Brisbane Valley though, I observed that when the signal got weak, the Kite was more willing to drop back to 3G, whereas the two ZTE phones hung onto that little scrap of 4G.  Yes, 4G might give clearer call quality and faster speeds in ideal conditions, but these conditions are not ideal, we’re in fringe coverage.

The 4G standards use much more dense forms of modulation (QPSK, 16-QAM or 64-QAM) than 3G (QPSK only) trading off spectral efficiency for signal-to-noise performance, thus lean more heavily on forward error correction to achieve communications in adverse conditions.  When a symbol is corrupted, more data is lost with these standards.  3G might be slower, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race, fast and flaky is a recipe of frustration.

A more scientific experiment, where we are stationary, and can let each device “settle” before taking a reading, would be worthwhile.  Without a doubt, the Kite runs rings around the T83.  The T84 is less clear: the T84 and the Kite both run the same chipset; the Qualcomm MSM8916.  The T83 runs the older MSM8930.

By rights, the T84 and Kite should perform nearly identical, with the Kite having the advantage of a high-gain whip antenna instead of a more conventional patch panel antenna.  The only edge the T84 has, is the 700MHz band, which isn’t that heavily deployed here in Australia right now.

The T83 and T84 can take an external antenna, but the socket is designed for cradle use and isn’t as rugged or durable as the SMA connector used on the Kite.  It’s soldered to the PCB, and when a cable is plugged in, it disconnects the internal antenna.

Thus damage to this connector can render these phones useless.  The SMA connector on the Kite however is a pigtail to an IPX socket inside … a readily available off-the-shelf (mail-order) part.  People may not like the whip sticking out though.

The Kite does ship with a patch antenna, which is about 75% efficient; so maybe 0dBi at best, however I think making the case another 10mm longer and incorporating the whip into the top of the phone so the antenna can tuck away when not needed, is a better plan.  It would not be hard to make the case accommodate it so it’s invisible and can fold out, or be replaced with a coax connection to an external antenna.

If there’s time, I’ll try to get some more conclusive tests done, but there’s no guarantees on that.

May 192018
 

Recently, a new project sprang up on the Hackaday.io site; it was for the KiteBoard, an open-source cellular development platform.  In a nutshell, this is a single-board-computer that embeds a full mobile system-on-chip and runs the Android operating system.  The project is seeking crowd funding for the second version of this platform.

With it, you can build smartphones (of course), tablets, tele-presence robots, or really, any project which can benefit from a beefy CPU with a built-in cellular modem.  It comes as a kit, which you then assemble yourself.  The level of difficulty in assembly is no greater than that of assembling a desktop PC: the circuit boards are pre-populated, you just need to connect them together.  In this version, some soldering of pushbuttons and wires is needed: all through-hole components.  No reflow ovens or solder paste is necessary here, an 8-year-old could do it.

The break-out board for the CPU card features in addition to connections for all the usual cellular phone signals (e.g. earpiece, microphone, button inputs) a GPIO header that follows the de-facto standard “Raspberry Pi” interface, allowing many Raspberry Pi “hats” to plug directly into this board.

That lends itself greatly to expandability.  Want a eInk or OLED notification display on the back?  A scrolling LED display?  A piano?  A games console?  Knock yourself out!  You, are the designer, you decide.  There are lots of options.

I for one, would consider an amateur radio transceiver, an external antenna socket and a beefier battery.  Presently, I get around with the ZTE T83 (“Telstra Dave”), which works okay, but as it runs an old version of Android (4.1), running newer applications on it is a problem.  I believe it could run something newer, but ZTE believe that their job was finished in 2013 when the first one rolled off the production line.

The box did not include a copy of the kernel sources or any link to where that could be obtained.  (GNU GPL v2 section 2b?  What’s that?)

The successor, the T84 is a little better, in fact it has pretty much the same hardware that’s in Kite, but it struggles in rural areas.  On a recent trip into the Snowy Mountains, my phone would be working fine, when my father’s T84 would report “no service available”.  Clearly, someone at Telstra/ZTE screwed up the firmware on it, and so it fails to switch networks correctly.  Without the sources, we are unable to fix that.  Even something as simple as replacing a battery is neigh on impossible, they’re built like bombs: not designed to be taken apart.

I have no desire to spend money on a company that puts out poorly supported rubbish running pirated operating system kernels.  The story is similar elsewhere, and most devices while better in specs and operating system, lack the external antenna connection that I desire in a phone.

Kite represents a breath of fresh air in that regard.  It is to smart phones, what the Raspberry Pi is to single board computers in general.  It’s not only designed to be taken apart, it’s shipped to you as parts.  Apparently with Kite v2, there’ll be schematics available, so you’ll be able to look-up the datasheets of respective components and be able to make informed decisions about part substitutions.  All antenna connections are socketed, so you can substitute at will.

While the OS isn’t going to be as open as one might like (mobile chipset manufacturers like their black boxes), it’s a BIG step in the right direction.  There’s more scope for supporting this platform long-term, than contemporary ones.

As far as actually using Kite, Shree Kumar was generous enough to organise the loan of a Kite for me to test with the Australian networks.  The phone takes up to two micro-SIMs (about 15mm×12mm); one on the daughter card (this is SIM 1) and one on the CPU card (SIM 2).

For the sake of testing, I figured I’d try it out with the two major networks, Telstra and Optus.  As it happens, my Telstra SIM is too big (they call it a “full-size” SIM now; I remember full-size SIMs being credit-card sized), so rather than chopping up my existing SIM or getting it transferred, I bought and activated a prepaid service.  I also bought a SIM for Optus.  I bought $10 credit for each.

As it happens, the Optus one came with data, the Telstra did not.  No big deal in this case.  The phone does have a limitation in that it will talk to one 3G/4G network and one GSM (2G) network at a time.  Given both networks I chose have abandoned 2G, that pretty much means the dual-SIM functionality on this model is severely hobbled.  That said, either SIM can operate in 3G mode, and so it’s simple enough to switch one SIM into 2G mode then activate the other in 3G/4G mode.  So far, the Kite has spent most of its time on Optus.

Evidently Vodaphone still have a 2G network… at least the Kite does see one 2G cell operated by them.  Long term, this is a problem that all dual-SIM phone chipset makers will have to deal with, a future Kite may well be able to do 3G simultaneously on both SIMs, but for me, this is not a show-stopper.

I’ve put together this review of the Kite.  It’s rare for me to be in front of a camera instead of behind it, and yes, the editing is very rough.  If there is time (there won’t be this weekend) I hope to take the phone out to a rural area and try it out with the more distant networks, but so far it seems happy enough to switch to 3G when I get home, and use 4G when I’m at work, so this I see as a promising sign.

The KickStarter is lagging behind quite a way in the funding goal, but alternate options are being considered for getting this project off-the-ground.  Here’s hoping that the project does get up, and that we get to see Kite v2 being developed and made for real, as I think the mobile phone industry really does need a viable open competitor.

Sep 072017
 

This is a quick brain-dump, as doing a quick Google search did not help, taking me to a mailing list thread I had posted about 2.5 years ago.  I swear there’s a song in that… something about the dreaded Google Echo.

Anyway, unlike that last occasion where the modem wasn’t even seen at all (and no, I didn’t solve it, we stuffed a 3G dongle in the case in the end), this time around, ModemManager sees it.  It just so happens that nmtui doesn’t do wireless broadband. These were the magic commands.

root@wsg-74fe481fe117:~# nmcli connection edit type gsm con-name telstra-nextg

===| nmcli interactive connection editor |===

Adding a new 'gsm' connection

Type 'help' or '?' for available commands.
Type 'describe [.]' for detailed property description.

You may edit the following settings: connection, gsm, serial, ipv4
nmcli>

From here, we need to set the APN, telstra.internet.

nmcli> set gsm.apn telstra.internet

Having done that, we give the configuration a last check before saving it:

nmcli> print all
… lots of settings …
nmcli> save persistent
Saving the connection with 'autoconnect=yes'. That might result in an immediate activation of the connection.
Do you still want to save? (yes/no) [yes] (enter)
Connection 'telstra-nextg' (57c78d91-4a66-475b-8843-2cba590fbcfd) successfully saved.
nmcli> quit